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Field Artillery in the European Theater
US Army, Europe

Looking for more information from military/civilian personnel assigned to or associated with the U.S. Army in Germany from 1945 to 1989. If you have any stories or thoughts on the subject, please contact me.


The Early Years (1950s)

Reflagging

The 1960s
OOB Info June 1965
8" Howitzer
Lacrosse
Sergeant
Redstone
Pershing 1

The 1970s
OOB info Sept 1970
OOB info June 1976
155mm Howitzer
8" Howitzer

Lance
Pershing 1A
Nuclear Warheads
ICCE Units

The 1980s
OOB info
Pershing 2
MLRS



 
The 1960s
 

Weapons of the US Army's Field Artillery, 1966 (YouTube)
(Use & capabilities of Field Artillery Weaponry - cannon, rocket and missile categories)
(Source: USAREUR/7th ARMY Station List, 30 June 1965)
ORDER OF BATTLE - USAREUR/7th ARMY NON-DIVISIONAL ARTILLERY (JUNE 1965)

The following lists show the non-divisional field artillery units assigned to USAREUR in June 1965 and their attachments to the various Corps field artillery groups. Please
contact me for any corrections, additions, suggestions or comments.
 
V CORPS ARTILLERY

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, V Corps Arty CFK, Darmstadt
Btry F (AVN), 26th FA Griesheim AAF, Darmstadt  
36th FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 36th FA Gp Babenhausen
2nd Bn, 5th FA (175mm)(SP) Babenhausen
5th Bn, 77th FA (SGT) Babenhausen  
3rd Bn, 80th FA (SGT) Ludwig Ksn, Darmstadt
Btry A (TA), 1st Bn, 26th FA Ludwig Ksn, Darmstadt  
42nd FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 42nd FA Gp Depot, Giessen
6th Bn, 9th FA (175mm)(SP) Rivers Bks, Giessen
2nd Bn, 18th FA (8in)(SP) Schloss Ksn, Butzbach
3rd MSL Bn, 79th FA (HJ) Rivers Bks, Giessen
2nd Bn, 92nd FA (8in)(SP) Rivers Bks, Giessen
212th FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 42nd FA Gp Depot, Giessen
4th Bn, 18th FA (155mm)(SP) Francois Ksn, Hanau  
2nd Bn, 75th FA (8in)(SP) Fliegerhorst Ksn, Hanau
2nd Bn, 83rd FA (8in)(SP) Armstrong Ksn, Büdingen  
Btry B (TA), 1st Bn, 26th FA Francois Ksn, Hanau  
 
VII CORPS ARTILLERY

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, VII Corps Arty Kelley Bks, Möhringen
Btry D (AVN), 25th FA Kelley Bks, Möhringen
35th FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 35th FA Gp Warner Bks, Bamberg
6th Bn, 10th FA (175mm)(SP) Warner Bks, Bamberg
1st Bn, 36th FA (8in)(SP) Ferris Bks, Erlangen
5th Bn, 73rd FA (SGT) Ferris Bks, Erlangen
1st Bn, 75th FA (8in)(SP) Warner Bks, Bamberg
A Btry (TA), 2nd Bn, 25th FA Warner Bks, Bamberg  
72nd FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 72nd FA Gp Peden Bks, Wertheim
3rd MSL Bn, 21st FA (HJ) Larson Bks, Kitzingen
2nd Bn, 37th FA (155mm)(SP) Daley Bks, Bad Kissingen
3rd Bn, 37th FA (8in)(SP) Dachau Ksn, Dachau
210th FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 210th FA Gp Barton Bks, Ansbach
3rd Bn, 17th FA (8in)(SP) Merrell Bks, Nürnberg
2nd Bn, 28th FA (175mm)(SP) Hindenburg Ksn, Ansbach
1st MSL Bn, 33rd FA (HJ) Barton Bks, Ansbach
2nd Bn, 34th FA (155mm)(SP) Merrell Bks, Nürnberg
1st MSL Bn, 68th FA (SGT) Bleidorn Ksn, Ansbach
C Btry (TA), 2nd Bn, 25th FA Bleidorn Ksn, Ansbach  
 
ABBREVIATIONS:
SP ... Self Propelled
HJ ... Honest John
SGT ... Sergeant
TA ... Target Acquisition

 
(Source: TRUPPENPRAXIS - Heft 5, Mai 1963 - German Bundeswehr journal)
 
A wonderful schematic that appeared with an article by Oberstleutnant Dr. Bodo Hahn on the status of missile artillery in the early 1960s. I have taken the liberty of modifying the schematic slightly by highlighting some of the key points with color. I will go into more detail as I enhance this section with additional articles on the atomic artillery units of the 1950s, 60s and 70s.


Click on thumbnail to view a larger version of the schematic.
 

REDSTONE units
(Source: Annual Historical Report, HQs USAREUR, 1 Jul 1958-30 Jun 1959, HQ USAREUR 1960)
The 40th Missile Group, which was the first Redstone unit to arrive in Europe, became fully operational on 10 October 1958. The second Redstone unit, the 46th Missile Group, was stationed at Neckarsulm in the spring of 1959; it achieved operational readiness by 31 May 1959.

 

UNIT DESIGNATION

ARRIVED IN COMD COMMENTS
40th Arty Group (REDSTONE) Wackernheim
46th Arty Group (REDSTONE) Neckarsulm

(Source: Email from Jim Jenkins)
 
Soldiers of A Battery, 40th Artillery Group, in Eckweiler, Germany, raise the Redstone ballistic missile into firing position during a training exercise in December 1958.

NOTE: Unit markings on bumber (40GP-F-RS217F-A-38) indicated that the firing unit belongs to "A" Battery, 217th FAM Bn. The 217th was attached to the 40th Group at Redstone Arsenal prior to the Group's move to Germany. So -- is this actually a photo of the 40th Group prior to its deployment to Germany or did the Group deploy its equipment with the old markings???

See Jim Ryan's response!

 
SPECIAL AMMUNITION STORAGE FOR REDSTONE MISSILE UNITS
 


REDSTONE system

 

1. REDSTONE missile (KB)


 


2.
Warhead, M481 semi-trailer (KB)


3. Missile main section, M482 semi-trailer (KB)



4. Aft unit, M480 trailer (KB)



5. (KB)

6. (KB)

7. (KB)
 

8. (KB)

9. (KB)

10. (KB)
 

LACROSSE units
 
(Sources: History of the Lacrosse Guided Missile System, 1947-1962, Historical Div, US Army Missile Command, September 1962; STATION LIST, 16 April 1962)

UNIT DESIGNATION

ARRIVED IN COMD COMMENTS
2nd Msl Bn, 22nd Arty (Lacrosse)(SP) Nov 1960 [1]
4th Msl Bn, 28th Arty (Lacrosse)(SP) Apr 1960 Ansbach, probably 210th FA Gp [2]
5th Msl Bn, 33rd Arty (Lacrosse)(SP) Oct 1960 [3]
5th Msl Bn, 39th Arty (Lacrosse)(SP) Sep 1960 Bamberg, 35th FA Gp [4]
5th Msl Bn, 42nd Arty (Lacrosse)(SP) Mar 1960 Aschaffenburg [5]
 

[1] 165th Ord Det (GM DS)(Lacrosse)
[2] 169th Ord Det (GM DS)(Lacrosse), Ansbach
[3] 163rd Ord Det (GM DS)(Lacrosse)
[4] 178th Ord Det (GM DS)(Lacrosse), Bamberg
[5] 18th Ord Det (GM DS)(Lacrosse), Aschaffenburg
Two additional ordnance units are listed with a Lacrosse support mission:
7th Ord Det (GM GS)(Lacrosse), Pirmasens and
167th Ord Det (GM GS)(Lacrosse), Wiesbaden.

 
Missile Artillery (LACROSSE) Units (1960s)

2nd Msl Bn, 22nd Arty

4th Msl Bn, 28th Arty

5th Msl Bn, 33rd Arty

5th Msl Bn, 39th Arty
 

5th Msl Bn, 42nd Arty
       

 
(Source: Email from Lynton C. Stewart Former SFC, AMEDS - see Lynton's other email on the 35th FA Group Page)
There was another guided missile in the 7th Army during the 1960's. It was the Lacrosse, a short range guided missile.

I was assigned to Hq & Hq Battery of the 5th Missile Battalion, 39th Artillery in Bamberg, Germany from 1961-1963. I remember well the train trip from Bremerhaven to Bamberg, with a stopover in Bamberg. We were outfitted with the Lacrosse. It was a winged guided missle, with about a twenty mile range. It carried either a nuclear or conventional warhead. It was very accurate (at least at Graf it was when our Bn. fired it).

We were set to fire them from our motor pool during the Cuban Missile Crisis. That was the only time we ever fitted the Nuclear warheads to the missiles.

The 5th Missile Bn, 39th Artillery is the only one that I know of with the Lacrosse. I don't know when they were formed (as a Missile Unit), but they disbanded in 1963, after the Lacrosse was declared obsolete.

I enjoyed Bamberg. It is a very historic town, which suffered virtually no damage during the war. I spent a lot of my time traveling aorund Europe, at the cheapest rates I've ever seen. The barracks were old Bavarian Army Calvary barracks, and had the stables in the basement/ground floor. Our Battalion was very small, and we used one large building, and a mess hall.

When the LaCrosse was declared obsolete, our building became the Headquarters of the 35 Artillery Group. Next to the 5/39 was the 2nd Battalion, 35th Artillery. They had 155 towed artillery. When the 5/39 Artillery was brocken up, I was reassigned to the 2/35. Then, a couple of months later, it was re-designated the 1st Battalion, 75th Artillery. We were equipped with the brand new M-110 8" Self Propelled Artillery, with both conventional and nuclear capability.

We had several of our guys wounded at Graf in 1964, when a shell went off about ten feet from the end of the tube. It was our first trip to Grafenwoehr (spelling) with the brand new M-110's. Scared the crap out of me, I can tell you! The Bamberg Military web page has a picture of Lt. Colonel Johnsrud (our Bn. C.O.), training people on the M-110 in 1964. We also had units of the 3rd Infantry Division, replaced by units of the 4th Armored Division; the 2nd Armored Calvry, along with the 82nd Engineers, while I was there (6/61-12/64). There was also an anti-aircraft missle Bn., and a bunch of other supporting units. I LOVED Bamberg. I would have done anything to get back there.

I re-enlisted in the 1/75, and went back to the States in 12/64.

I was assigned to Valley Forge General Hospital, where I spent most of the next five years. I kept submitting 1049's to get back to Europe, with no success. I sure loved it over there.
Lynton C. Stewart

(Email from SGT Josh Liscano, III Corps Artillery Assistant SGS)
RESEARCH REQUEST

My name is SGT Liscano, I am the Asst SGS at III Corps Artillery Headquarters at Fort Sill, OK. We are in the process of dedicating a building to COL William H. Hamilton. He commanded a Lacrosse Unit in the 60s but we have been unable to distinguish which one he commanded.

I ran across the webpage and saw that you had some info on some units, and I thought I would ask. Your help would be greatly appreciated. Please feel free to email me.
 
RESPONSE

(Source: Email from Thomas E. Haney)
I tried to respond to the above research request asking which Lacrosse unit Colonel William H. Hamilton commanded in the 1960's.  It was the 5th Missile Battalion, 42nd Artillery.  I was in the Firing Battery of that Battalion and remember Colonel Hamilton.
 
Me e-mail to the requestor, Sgt. Liscano, was not deliverable. 

I believe the 5th of the 42nd was the first Lacrosse unit in Germany. We arrived in Germany in March, 1960 and were stationed in Aschaffenburg.  We did have nuclear capability and spent a great deal of time on the East German and Czech borders.
 
I was a Spec. 4 -  Guidance Crewman.  The 5th of the 42nd was still an active Lacrosse unit when I was discharged in March, 1962.

(Source: Email from Doug Schlumbohm, 4th Missile Battalion, 28th Artillery (Lacrosse), 1960-63)

I was stationed at Bleidorn Kaserne in Ansbach with the 4th Missile Battalion, 28th Artillery (Lacrosse) from 1960 - 1963 and with the 1st Battalion, 68th Artillery (Sergeant) from 1964 - 1966. I am also Secretary of the 4th Missile Battalion, 28th Artillery Lacrosse Missile Association (1959-1963). Our third reunion is coming up in October 2003 in Lawton, OK. Please visit our website at http://hillsboro.net/users/lacrosse/.

I've been putting together a "Book of Memories" for our next reunion and have gathered quite a bit of "stuff", including newspaper clippings from the Lawton Constitution. A bit of history: The Lacrosse Missile System came about as a result of a post-World War II requirement for a guided missile to supplement conventional artillery in close support of ground troops. The 4th Msl Bn, 28th Arty was the third Lacrosse Battalion to be activated and was assigned to the 1st Missile Brigade at Fort Sill. Lt Col Richard C. Morehouse Jr. accepted the colors from Gen Bruce C. Clarke, Commanding General of the Continental Army Command during activation ceremonies at Fort Sill on June 22, 1959.

In September, Lt Col Morehouse was selected to attend the National War College and Lt Col Leo M. Blanchette Jr., assumed command. The 4th Msl Bn, 28th Arty left Brooklyn Army Terminal on 25 April 1960 aboard the Gen Maurice Rose, arriving in Bremerhaven 10 days later. Traveling overnight by train, the unit occupied Bliedorn Kaserne in Ansbach on the 6th of May, 1960. Upon arrival in Germany, the 4th Msl Bn, 28th Arty was assigned to the 210th Artillery Group with the mission of general support to VII Corps.

Lt Col Joseph J. Matthews Jr., assumed command in 1961 after Lt Col Blanchette was reassigned to Headquarters, USAREUR. In early 1963, Lt Col Matthews rotated back to the States and Lt Col Walter Berthelsen took over, commanding the unit until its deactivation in October 1963.

The 4th Msl Bn, 28th Arty replaced the 2nd Bn, 44th Arty (I think), a Corporal Missile Unit, in May of 1960. There were a total of eight (8) Lacrosse battalions activated -- 6th Msl Bn, 8th Arty (Korea); 4th Msl Bn, 28th Arty (Germany); 5th Msl Bn, 33rd Arty; 4th Msl Bn, 39th Arty; 5th Msl Bn, 40th Arty; 4th Msl Bn, 41st Arty; 5th Msl Bn, 41st Arty; and 5th Msl Bn, 42d Arty. Where they were deployed to, I haven't the foggiest - - -

I believe 5 went to Germany and 1 went to Italy, but I'm not sure. I suspect that the reason the 4/28th was not included in the history of Bleidorn is because of the confusion caused between the 2/28th and the 4/28th having both occupied Bleidorn in close proximity. I spoke with the CO (then) of the 2/28th a few months ago. I think he is in the Tampa area but I'd have to check! my notes (if I can find them).

In 1966, the 1st Bn, 68th FA (Sergeant), relocated from Bleidorn Kaserne in Ansbach to Schwaebisch Hall and was reassigned to the 72 FA Gp.

Here is a partial rewrite of the info on Bleidorn Kaserne from what I know (and don't know). Hope it helps. If I remember correctly, the former CO of the 2/28th told me they were an 8-inch Howizer outfit -- I was under the impression that they were a 175mm outfit also; maybe because they were formerly the 1st Bn, 75th Arty when I was there; or maybe they turned in their 175's for 8-inchers. (??)

I'm trying to regain the contact info from the 2/28th from a guy who was in both outfits so I'll let you know if I get it. Meanwhile, here's the partial rewrite. Hope you can use it.

...Doug
In the early 1950's, the headquarters of the 18th Field Artillery Group moved into Bleidorn, and was accompanied by the 979th FA Bn (155-mm). The 979th was later redesigned as the 70th Armored Field Artillery Battalion in 1955, and remained until around 1960. In the early 1960's, the Kaserne was the home of the 2d Bn, 40th Artillery, a Corporal Missile Battalion. This unit remained in the Kaserne until deactivation in early 1960. In May 1960, the 4th Msl Bn, 28th Arty, a Lacrosse Missile Battalion, arrived from Ft Sill, OK and occupied Bleidorn until deactivation in October 1963. The 169th Ord Det deployed from Redstone Arsenal in support of the 4th Msl Bn, 28th Arty. In August 1964, the 1st Bn, 68th Arty, a Sergeant Missile Battalion arrived from Ft Sill and remained at Bleidorn until it moved to Schwaebisch Hall in 1966 where it was reassigned to the 75th Artillery Group. In mid-1966, the 1st Bn, 75th Arty, stationed at Hindenburg Kaserne, was redesignated the 2d Bn, 28th Arty (Webmaster Note: originally reported as an 8-inch Howitzer, but Barry Miller corrected it - 2-28th was
an 175 mm Arty unit) and relocated to Bleidorn. In addition to the 2d Bn, 28th Arty, several smaller units have occupied the Kaserne since 1966, including the 501st Military Police Company and elements of the 793d Military Police Company.

SERGEANT Missile units
 

Your Army Reports: 7th Army Sergeant missile unit, c. 1966 (YouTube)
(see report starting at 6:40 min into the program)
 

Weapons of the Field Artillery - mid-1960s: SERGEANT Guided Missile
(The Sergeant segment starts at 29:15 min)

1963 -
(Source: History of the SERGEANT Weapon System, Redstone Arsenal, 1971)

US Army SERGEANT deployments


Bundeswehr SERGEANT deployments
 
Army Deployment Plans
The phaseout of the CORPORAL missile system would be accomplished according to the original schedule, with the activation and deployment of the six authorized US SERGEANT battalions to be completed between June 1962 and June 1964. The first three US battalions would be activated by 30 June 1962. Another battalion would join the group by 30 June 1963 with activation of the last two by 30 June 1964. The phase in of the SERGEANT would then be completed with deployment of one battalion to the Pacific, one to the Strategic Army Forces, and four to the US Army, Europe. The number of MAP (Military Assistance Program) battalions remained unchanged, the plan calling for three German double-strength battalions (i.e., with four firing batteries instead of two) and one Belgian battalion.

Employment
Though not yet stabilized in design and support capabilities, the SERGEANT weapon system issued to the field in 1962 fulfilled its military objective as a drastic improvement over, and replacement for the CORPORAL missile system which had been operational since 1954. Briefly, the SERGEANT's mission was to attack and destroy major targets deep in enemy territory, such as large troop concentrations, nuclear delivery systems, communications centers, and command and supply installations. Its 75-mile range, its all-weather delivery capability, and its choice of nuclear, biological, or chemical warheads would enable the corps commander to wipe out enemy threats at a distance and of a magnitude far greater than was possible in World War II or even Korea.
 
The SERGEANT was fielded in battalions of two firing batteries, each having one launching station. Each firing unit, or battery, had its own survey, communications, maintenance, and administrative personnel, and could thus operate at distances far from its battalion headquarters. Backing up the launching station, normally in a separate area, was the firing battery's OMTS; and backing up the latter, in a central battalion location, was the FMTS of the organic Direct Support Unit (DSU), later redesignated as the Missile Maintenance Platoon (MMP).

Tactical Deployment
Except for a change in the number of US and MAP units, the tactical deployment of the SERGEANT weapon system was accomplished essentially according to the plan laid out in late 1961. The number of authorized US battalions was increased from six to seven, the planned Belgian (MAP) battalion was cancelled, and the number of double-strength German (MAP) battalions was increased from three to four. Between June 1962 and September 1964, all seven of the Army battalions and their support units were equipped, trained, and deployed -- one to Fort Sill, Oklahoma (Strategic Army Corps), five to Europe (four in Germany and one in Italy), and one to Korea. Deployment of the original three MAP battalions to the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) was completed in 1963-64 and the fourth in 1965-66.

The CORPORAL weapon system was phased out of the field as SERGEANT units became available. Inactivation of the first European battalion occurred on 31 March 1963. By 10 June 1964, all of the CORPORAL missile maintenance technicians had left the Seventh Army and the last CORPORAL artillery unit was inactivated on 25 June 1964.
 

March 1963 The first U.S. SERGEANT battalion was deployed overseas.

1963-1964 Three Military Assistance Program (MAP) SERGEANT battalions were deployed to Germany.

September 1964 Between January 62 and September 64, all seven Army SERGEANT battalions and support units were equipped, trained, and deployed: one to the Strategic Army Corps; five to Europe; and one to Korea.

1965-1966 The last MAP SERGEANT battalion was deployed to Germany.

23 June 1970 The four U.S. SERGEANT units in Germany were reconstituted as two double-strength battalions.

May 1977 The last SERGEANT battalion was phased out of the U.S. Army

 
SERGEANT Units in Germany 1965

UNIT DESIGNATION

LOCATION COMMENTS
1st Bn, 68th FA (SGT) Ansbach 210th Arty Gp [1]
5th Bn, 73rd FA (SGT) Erlangen 35th Arty Gp [1]
5th Bn, 77th FA (SGT) Babenhausen 36th Arty Gp [1]
3rd Bn, 80th FA (SGT) Darmstadt 36th Arty Gp [1]
[1] USAREUR Station List, 30 Sept 1965
 
SERGEANT Units in Germany 1972

UNIT DESIGNATION

LOCATION COMMENTS
5th Bn, 73rd FA (SGT) Crailsheim VII Corps Arty [1]
5th Bn, 77th FA (SGT) Wiesbaden V Corps Arty [1]
[1] USAREUR Station List, 30 Sept 1972

(Source: The Sergeant Guided Missile System, M-2700, June 1970)

M-2700, June 1970
 
A pamphlet created to provide students at the US Army Field Artillery School with an unclassified reference outlining the organization, capabilities, operations, and methods of employment of the Field Artillery Battalion, Sergeant.

The Sergeant system is considered primarily a nuclear delivery system; therefore, in the discussion of tactical concepts the field army is assumed to be deployed for a nuclear war.

Scanned Pages:
Page 1 Introduction; Characteristics   Page 16 Trajectory; Survey
Page 2 Characteristics   Page 17 Fire Direction
Page 3 Missile Sections   Page 18 Fire Direction
Page 4 Ground Handling Equip.   Page 19 Fire Direction
Page 5 Ground Handling Equip.   Page 20 Communications
Page 6 Ground Handling Equip.   Page 21 Communications
Page 7 Ground Handling Equip.   Page 22 Communications
Page 8 Ground Handling Equip.   Page 23 Communications
Page 9 Maintenance; Missile Assembly   Page 24 Organization
Page 10 Missile Assembly   Page 25 Organization
Page 11 Missile Assembly   Page 26 Organization
Page 12 Missile Assembly   Page 27 Employment
Page 13 Firing Set & Countdown Ops   Page 28 Employment
Page 14 Firing Set & Countdown Ops   Page 29 Employment
Page 15 Firing Set & Countdown Ops   Page 30 Employment; Summary

PERSHING 1 Missile units
 

Weapons of the Field Artillery - mid-1960s: PERSHING Guided Missile
(The Pershing segment starts at 33:14 min and shows the Pershing I missile)

 

 
The 1970s
(Source: USAREUR/7th ARMY Station List, 30 Sept 1970)
ORDER OF BATTLE - USAREUR/7th ARMY NON-DIVISIONAL ARTILLERY (SEPTEMBER 1970)

The following lists show the non-divisional field artillery units assigned to USAREUR in September 1970 and their attachments to the various Corps field artillery groups. Please
contact me for any corrections, additions, suggestions or comments.
 
V CORPS ARTILLERY

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, V Corps Arty CFK, Darmstadt
36th FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 36th FA Gp Babenhausen
2nd Bn, 5th FA (175mm)(SP) Babenhausen
1st MSL Bn, 32nd FA (HJ) Fliegerhorst Ksn, Hanau
2nd Bn, 75th FA (8in)(SP) Fliegerhorst Ksn, Hanau
5th Bn, 77th FA (SGT) Babenhausen  
Btry B (TA), 26th FA CFK, Darmstadt  
42nd FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 42nd FA Gp Depot, Giessen
6th Bn, 9th FA (175mm)(SP) Rivers Bks, Giessen
3rd MSL Bn, 79th FA (HJ) Rivers Bks, Giessen
2nd Bn, 83rd FA (8in)(SP) Armstrong Ksn, Büdingen  
2nd Bn, 92nd FA (8in)(SP) Rivers Bks, Giessen
Btry A (TA), 26th FA Pendleton Bks, Giessen  
 
VII CORPS ARTILLERY

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, VII Corps Arty Kelley Bks, Möhringen
35th FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 35th FA Gp Warner Bks, Bamberg
6th Bn, 10th FA (175mm)(SP) Warner Bks, Bamberg
3rd Bn, 17th FA (8in)(SP) Merrell Bks, Nürnberg
3rd Bn, 37th FA (8in)(SP) Eastman Bks, Dachau
1st Bn, 75th FA (8in)(SP) Warner Bks, Bamberg
A Btry (TA), 25th FA Warner Bks, Bamberg  
72nd FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 72nd FA Gp Peden Bks, Wertheim
3rd MSL Bn, 21st FA (HJ) Fiori Bks, Aschaffenburg
3rd Bn, 35th FA (8in)(SP) Peden Bks, Wertheim
5th Bn, 73rd FA (SGT) McKee Bks, Crailsheim
C Btry (TA), 25th FA Peden Bks, Wertheim  
210th FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 210th FA Gp Barton Bks, Ansbach
2nd Bn, 28th FA (175mm)(SP) Bleidorn Ksn, Ansbach
1st MSL Bn, 33rd FA (HJ) Barton Bks, Ansbach
1st Bn, 36th FA (8in)(SP) Reese Bks, Augsburg
 
ABBREVIATIONS:
SP ... Self Propelled
HJ ... Honest John
SGT ... Sergeant
TA ... Target Acquisition

(Source: USAREUR/7th ARMY Station List, 1 June 1976)
ORDER OF BATTLE - USAREUR/7th ARMY NON-DIVISIONAL ARTILLERY (JUNE 1976)

The following lists show the non-divisional field artillery units assigned to USAREUR in June 1976 and their attachments to the various Corps field artillery groups. Please
contact me for any corrections, additions, suggestions or comments.
 
V CORPS ARTILLERY

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, V Corps Arty CFK, Darmstadt
41st FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 41st FA Gp Babenhausen
2nd Bn, 5th FA (175mm)(SP) Babenhausen
1st Bn, 32nd FA (Lance) Fliegerhorst Ksn, Hanau
2nd Bn, 75th FA (8in)(SP) Fliegerhorst Ksn, Hanau
2nd Bn, 83rd FA (8in)(SP) Babenhausen  
Btry B (TA), 26th FA CFK, Darmstadt  
42nd FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 42nd FA Gp Depot, Giessen
6th Bn, 9th FA (175mm)(SP) Rivers Bks, Giessen
3rd Bn, 79th FA (Lance) Rivers Bks, Giessen
2nd Bn, 92nd FA (8in)(SP) Rivers Bks, Giessen
1st Bn, 333rd FA (Lance) Eschborn Ksn, Eschborn or should this be Camp Pieri, Wiesbaden?
Btry A (TA), 26th FA Pendleton Bks, Giessen  
 
VII CORPS ARTILLERY

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, VII Corps Arty Kelley Bks, Möhringen
72nd FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 72nd FA Gp Peden Bks, Wertheim
6th Bn, 10th FA (175mm)(SP) Warner Bks, Bamberg
3rd Bn, 35th FA (8in)(SP) Peden Bks, Wertheim
2nd Bn, 42nd FA (Lance) McKee Bks, Crailsheim  
1st Bn, 75th FA (8in)(SP) Warner Bks, Bamberg
1st Bn, 80th FA (Lance) Fiori Bks, Aschaffenburg  
C Btry (TA), 25th FA Peden Bks, Wertheim  
210th FIELD ARTILLERY GROUP:

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHB, 210th FA Gp Herzogenaurach
3rd Bn, 17th FA (8in)(SP) Merrell Bks, Nürnberg
2nd Bn, 28th FA (175mm)(SP) Bleidorn Ksn, Ansbach
1st Bn, 36th FA (8in)(SP) Reese Bks, Augsburg
3rd Bn, 37th FA (8in)(SP) Herzogenaurach
2nd Bn, 377th FA (Lance) Herzogenaurach  
A Btry (TA), 25th FA Herzogenaurach  
 
ABBREVIATIONS:
SP ... Self Propelled
TA ... Target Acquisition

Atomic Projectiles Field Artillery
1970s
(Source: Field Artillery Journal, March-April 1980)
Artillery Fired Atomic Projectiles - US and NATO
 
NUC ARTY SYS
WARHEAD
_COMMENTS
 
M109 155-mm How
 
 
M110 8-inch How
entered the inventory around 1956
 
MGR-1 Honest John Rkt
HJ initially outfitted with the W7 (up to 20 kt) warhead; W31 - up to 40 kt
 
MGM-52 Lance Msl
 
 
Pershing 1A Msl
 

LANCE Missile units

Big Picture Series: MGM-52 Lance Missile (Movie - 8+ min) (Source: YouTube)
1973
(Source: )
LANCE Missile System
The LANCE was developed as a mobile surface-to-surface weapon system in 1962.

T
he LANCE was a mobile field artillery tactical missile system used to provide both nuclear and non-nuclear general fire support to the Army Corps. Designed to attack key enemy targets beyond the range of cannon artillery and to reinforce the fires of other artillery units, the LANCE replaced the HONEST JOHN system and the SERGEANT system. It filled the U.S. Army’s need for a highly mobile, medium-range, fin stabilized, all weather, surface-to-surface missile weapon system. The LANCE’s primary mission targets included enemy missile firing positions, airfields, transportation centers, command and logistic installations, critical terrain features (defiles, bridgeheads, main supply routes, etc.), and large troop concentrations.

NORTHAG LANCE
units & depots


CENTAG LANCE
units & depots

 

Unlike other Army missiles that use solid propellants, the LANCE used a prepackaged, liquid fuel that eliminated any need for fueling in the field and gave the LANCE a short reaction time. It was capable of delivering nuclear warheads out to a range of about 75 miles and conventional warheads to a range of about 45 miles.

The missile system briefly gained notoriety as the "neutron bomb," after the Washington Post reported on the Army’s development of a warhead for the LANCE that would kill people but cause minimal destruction of property. The enhanced radiation warhead was designed to release within a restricted radius great quantities of neutrons which attacked the human central nervous system. The warhead would also reduce the heat and blast effects of conventional nuclear warheads, thereby reducing the destruction of buildings and collateral damage to civilian populated areas. Officials believed that the LANCE enhanced radiation warhead would deter a Soviet attack by threatening the U.S.S.R. with a weapon that could be used without destroying the Federal Republic of Germany in order to save it. Congress approved production funds for the new warhead on 13 July 1977, but President Jimmy Carter deferred production of the neutron warhead in April 1978.

LANCE missile production was approved in September 1970, and the first battalion (1st Bn, 333rd FA) was fielded to the U.S. Army, Europe (USAREUR) in September 1973. At that time, the system achieved its initial operational capability (IOC). Less than two years later, the first full-scale deployment of the LANCE to a foreign military sales (FMS) customer was accomplished. Once it was fully fielded, the Army had eight LANCE battalions, six in Europe and two in the United States. LANCE was also sold to NATO allies and to Israel in the non-nuclear version.

Originally scheduled to be retired in the mid-1980s, the LANCE system was extended through 1990. DA subsequently decided in June 1985 to extend the nuclear-only LANCE shelf life to 1995. However, on 27 September 1991, President George Bush announced a unilateral cut in nuclear weapons, which was followed on 5 October by a similar announcement by President Mikhail Gorbachev of the U.S.S.R. Although the Soviet Union collapsed shortly thereafter, the United States later reaffirmed this nuclear arms reduction agreement by signing a treaty with Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine on 23 May 1992. The final LANCE battalion stood down at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, on 30 June 1992. After being demilitarized, excess LANCE missiles were set aside for use as targets.

MISCELLANEOUS
23 May 73 Equipment for the first LANCE overseas battalion was shipped to Germany.

September 73 The first LANCE battalion—the 1st Battalion, 333rd Field Artillery—was deployed overseas, achieving IOC for the system.

FY 1974 Four LANCE battalions (2-42; 2-79; 1-80; 3-277) were activated and one SERGEANT and five HONEST JOHN Battalions inactivated.

March 75 The first full-scale deployment of the LANCE system to a foreign military sales (FMS) customer (Italy) was accomplished.

September 75 LANCE deployment in USAREUR was completed. A total of 6 LANCE battalions replaced 4 SERGEANT [1] and 14 HONEST JOHN battalions (see tables below)

 
USAREUR LANCE Missile Units in the 1970s

UNIT DESIGNATION

ARRIVED IN COMD COMMENTS
1st Bn, 32nd FA (Lance) prev. HJ unit Hanau, 41st FA Gp
2nd Bn, 42nd FA (Lance)   Crailsheim, ? FA Gp
3rd Bn, 79th FA (Lance) prev. HJ unit Giessen, 42nd FA Gp
1st Bn, 80th FA (Lance)   Aschaffenburg, 72nd FA Gp
1st Bn, 333rd FA (Lance) Sep 1973 Wiesbaden, 42nd FA Gp
2nd Bn, 377th FA (Lance)   Herzogenaurach, 210th FA Gp


 
SERGEANT Units Replaced

UNIT DESIGNATION

LOCATION COMMENTS
5th Bn, 73rd FA (SGT) Crailsheim 72nd Arty Gp [2]
5th Bn, 77th FA (SGT) Babenhausen 36th Arty Gp [2]
[1] The four USAREUR SERGEANT units in Germany had been merged to form two double-strength battalions in 1970. (Source: SERGEANT Missile Page, Missilery Section, Redstone Arsenal Historical web site)
1st Bn, 68th FA (SGT), Dolan Bks, Schw. Hall, and 3rd Bn, 80th FA (SGT), Ludwig Ksn, Darmstadt, were the two units that were inactivated with personnel and equipment being transferred to the remaining SERGEANT battalions.
[2] USAREUR Station List, 30 Sep 1971
 
HONEST JOHN Units Replaced

UNIT DESIGNATION

LOCATION COMMENTS
1st Bn, 9th FA (HJ) Aschaffenburg [1] [3] 3rd ID Arty - inact. Jul 10, 1972
2nd Bn, 16th FA (HJ) Nürnberg [2] [3] 4th AD Arty - assigned to 1st AD on May 5, 1971; inact. Mar 21 1973
3rd Bn, 21st FA (HJ) Aschaffenburg [2] [3] 72nd FA Gp - inact. Sep 30 1974
1st Bn, 28th FA (HJ) Wackernheim [1] [3] 8th ID Arty - inact. Jul 10 1972
1st Bn, 32nd FA (HJ) Hanau [2] [3] probably 36th Arty Gp - reorg. as LANCE unit
5th Bn, 32nd FA (HJ) Neu Ulm [2] [3] 1st ID Arty - inact. May 21 1974
1st Bn, 33rd FA (HJ) Herzogenaurach [2] [3] 210th Arty Gp - inact. Mar 31 1974
2nd Bn, 73rd FA (HJ) Hanau [2] [3] 3rd AD Arty - inact. Jun 17 1974
3rd Bn, 79th FA (HJ) Giessen [2] [3] 42nd Arty Gp - reorg. as LANCE unit
incomplete    
[1] USAREUR Station List, 30 Sep 1971 - units listed with this footnote were possibly inactivated or redeployed back to the US in the 1971/72 period as they were not found in the 1972 Station List
[2] USAREUR Station List, 30 Sep 1972
[3] Harald Späth, Germany

 
(Source: Walter Elkins)
US ARMY REGIMENTAL SYSTEM Redesignations: (1)

FORMER DESIGNATION

LOCATION NEW DESIGNATION
1st Bn, 32nd FA (Lance) Hanau no change
3rd Bn, 79th FA (Lance) Giessen 2nd Bn, 32nd FA , Sep 1986
1st Bn, 333rd FA (Lance) Wiesbaden 3rd Bn, 32nd FA, Sep 1986
2nd Bn, 377th FA (Lance) Herzogenaurach 2nd Bn, 12th FA, 1987
1st Bn, 80th FA (Lance) Aschaffenburg 3rd Bn, 12th FA, 1987
2nd Bn, 42nd FA (Lance) Crailsheim 4th Bn, 12th FA, 1987
(1) As part of the the New Manning System that the US Army implemented in 1981, the Army also redesignated many combat, combat support and combat service support units under the US Army Regimental System (USARS). The purpose of USARS was to maintain the distinguished histories and traditions of the surviving regiments and to foster a sense of belonging and unit identity by affiliating soldiers with a regiment throughout their careers.


SW Depots
Lance system

 

1. NATO Site 23, Feucht (KB)


 

2.
View towards main gate and SSCC (KB)

3. Details of main gate (KB)


4. M977 10-ton trucks (KB)



5. Bunkers (KB)


 

6. NATO Site 35, Kitzingen
     

 
(Source: Stars & Stripes, European edition, Tuesday, August 20, 1979)
 

After a two-week, 4,560-mile journey with three other Chinook CH-37 helicopters from Fort Carson, Colorado, to Heidelberg, one of the choppers lifts a LANCE rocket and launcher over the autobahn and the Neckar River in a show of deployment capability.


 
(Source: The Aschaffenburg Forum, Oct 30, 1991)
Lance Bn inactivates

3rd Battalion, 12th Field Artillery inactivated quiety Oct 15 without the usual fanfare associated with the tnd of an era.

The Lance battalion said its formal goodbyes to Aschaffenburg in a farewell and awards ceremony Aug 16 as a prelude to its inactivation.

3rd Bn, 12th FA is part of the Army-wide lance compression (concept) changing the face of field artillery from three-by-two (three batteries with two launchers apiece) to a three-by-four (three batteries with four launchers each) configuration.

"Many of the soldiers looked at the compression as an opportunity to see a concept develop," lance battalion commander, Lt Col Dwight Gray, said.

"This concept was on the plans of USAREUR headquarters several years ago," Gray said.

Under the new system, a battalion is almost the same size, but has twice the firing capability as a battalion under the old system, battalion executive officer, Maj Hal Nyander, said.

"You have a larger number of delivery systems in one battalion so Command and Control is streamlined. One headquarters controls more assets. We don't need as many people in Command and Control to deliver the fire," Gray said. "There were six Lance battalions, and we're down to three now."

The lance compression, completed June 30, sent three launch platoons to 1st Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery, in Hanau along with the support personnel and equipment that goes along with those launchers, Nyander said.

Increased Combat Capability Europe
 
(Source: Email from Randy Brooks )
I need to do a bit of digging for details, but I can flesh out a bit of info as to FA units in VII Corps in 1976.
 
As your site shows, 1/18 FA and 1/30 FA were stationed from CONUS to Augsburg in 1976.  However, they were NOT the first ICCE Corps Arty units to do so.
 
When ICCE began, the first units to deploy were 1/17 FA (155 SP) and 2/18 FA (8-inch SP) from Ft. Sill, OK.  I was a 2nd Lieutenant in A Battery, 2/18 FA and deployed on what was to be a six month TDY tour to Germany.  What better way to get out of the hot sun at Ft. Sill for the summer!
 
I believe we departed in April or May after turning in our equipment at Ft. Sill.  A replacement unit, 1-12 FA was to stand up and take our old stuff.
 
We deployed to Kaiserslautern-Pirmasans area and drew our equipment from the POMCUS sites in that area.  The wheeled vehicles then convoyed from K-Town to Augsburg.
 
I had the "luck of the draw" as the Senior 2LT to be in "command" of the train with all the tracked vehicles belonging to the battalion.  Luckily, the Senior NCO in charge of the driver's party took charge of the troops.  He told me to just stay comfortable in my private compartment and not to worry about a thing.
 
Despite how it sounds now it was a relatively uneventful trip.  The only disturbance was when someone threw something out of a window while we were in a railyard and the station master had a fit.  We calmed him down and made it to Augsburg after about a 12 hour ride.
 
The Battalion Commander met me at the railyard and the job of detraining and moving the tracked vehicles to the motor pool commenced without much assistance from me.
 
In Augsburg, the 1/17 FA was sent to Reese Kassern and 2/18 FA was sent to Sheridan Kassern.  Our motor pool looked quite a bit like the open area in the photos on the 17th FA Bde link.  Though they had not paved them when we were there.  They were freshly covered in gravel.
 
We shared Sheridan with a Tank Bn from 1AD.  They were at Graf when we got there, so the Redlegs filled in at the NCO & EM clubs in taking care of the ladies they left behind.  When the Tank Bn returned, the inevitable skirmishes broke out, leading to the requirement to have a Staff Duty Officer make the rounds of the clubs to "keep a lid on."
 
Before deploying to Germany, we had heard that the troops at the front did PT every morning.  That was not routinely done at Ft. Sill.  So the unit started doing PT in the mornings before we left so we would be ready to get it right when we arrived.  Once we did arrive, we formed up for our first morning run as a Battalion and started out with relish.  We were "hi-hi-heeing in the field artillery" at the top of our lungs at 0630 around Sheridan Kassern.  When we got done we really knew we had done something the same as the boys in Germany and felt we had held up the "honor" of Ft Sill Redlegs everywhere!
 
However, the other tenant unit sharing our area of Sheridan Kassern was an Army Security Agency Unit that worked at the Intel Site at Gablingen.  They worked 8 hour shifts over a 24 hour day, so many were sleeping just getting off shift.  We were told that we could no longer make such a racket as the ASA soldiers needed their sleep!
 
We had previously noted that the big, luxurious Mercedes passenger busses were sitting outside of the 24 hour dining facility.  Something we had never seen before.  The busses at Ft. Sill were the beat-up Army style busses that had no AC and no springs.  We had wondered who the tourist busses were for!!
 
Well, I think we may have cut back on our PT a bit, and found a route that took us off post most of the way, but we most certainly enjoyed making at least one pass around the quad to make sure the ASA boys knew we still loved them.
 
While at Sheridan Kassern, the two FA Bns belonged to VII Corps Arty.  Your site says it inactivated in 1975, but I think that may not be correct.  I remember that the Corps Arty Cdr was still on Sheridan Kassern while we were there.  Don't recall his name right now.
 
Our Battalion went to Graf for two weeks and to Wildflecken for two weeks. I remember those, not for the opportunity to get to the field to train, but rather for the fact that we did NOT get TDY money while we were in the field!
 
It was right after we came back from Wildfleken we heard that the Army was going to stop the six month rotation concept.  The unit scheduled to replace us (1/30 FA) was being sent over to replace us early.  I suppose that was to allow them to arrive in time to get their kids in school or whatever.  But we were leaving early, so that was not too bad.  They asked for volunteers to stay and join the new unit upon arrival.  You would get tour credit for the TDY interval if you did.  I heard that the Bn Cdr for 1/30 FA was only going to be in command for 6 months as he had been scheduled to leave after his original six month tour.  Don't know if they replaced him before the unit arrived or not.  We had some soldiers stay, but most did not.  Too hard on their families to do that.
 
Interesting side note about 1/17 FA and 1/18 FA.  In the 70's VOLAR Army, you could enlist for station of choice, or unit of choice.  And at Ft. Sill, 1/17 FA was the unit of choice offered to soldiers from Arkansas.  They had big red razorback hogs painted on the side of their guns.  The Battalion Commander's Jeep had a red razorback hog painted on the panel holding the windshield of his jeep with the words "Head Hog!"  the 1/18 FA was the unit of choice for soldiers from Texas.  They had the Lone Star State flag painted on their guns.  During this time, all units in the US were mostly painted in olive drab, but emblems were painted in color.
 
The only decorations I remember on the equipment belonging to 2/18 FA were that the 4 M110's each had one of the 4 playing card suits on their tubes (spades, hearts, clubs, diamonds), but these were done in black.
 
I will try and find my TDY stuff to get you the dates.  And somewhere I have the hand receipt where I "signed" for the train with all the tracked vehicles on it.  Boy was I worried about how I was going to pay for the damage if anything happened while we were moving.  But my NCO told me: "Don't worry El-Tee, I will take care of everything!!"  I believed him, and he did just as he said.  As far as I know.
 
Use what you want out of this.  Hope it helps a bit.  I am impressed with what you have done.  Sure brings back great memories!

 
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