Area Commands
US Army, Europe

Looking for more information from military/civilian personnel assigned to or associated with the U.S. Army in Germany from 1945 to 1989. If you have any stories or thoughts on the subject, please email me (webmaster).


History

US Army Area Command
___Aviation Sec
___
SSU Frankfurt
___
Equip Maint Gp

Headquarters Area Command
___Station List Oct 1955
___7776th Sig Svc Co
___
527th MP Co
___Ord Svc Cen Mannheim
___Transportation Sec

Northern Area Command
___7772nd Sig Svc Co
___
74th AG Co (Postal)
___Ord Svc Cen (Roedelheim)
___QM Svc Cen Hanau

Southern Area Command
___Nürnberg District
(article)
___7777th Sig Svc Co
___30th Army Band
___Ord Field Maint Shops

Southeastern Area Command

Western Area Command
___SSU Kaiserslautern
___
427th Army Band
___Ord Svc Cen Kaiserslautern

Army Posts in Germany
(1960s)



 
History
 
Looking for assistance: need original or scanned copies of maps of Area Command, support districts, support activities, military communities and installations for further research.
 
A Brief History Of The Area Commands
In Germany
 
The following text is from an historical manuscript (probably a command briefing) that was supplied to me in the early 1980s by the USAREUR Military History Office in Heidelberg. Their support of my research efforts over the years and the great assistance provided to me by many other offices within USAREUR (primarily PAO) is greatly appreciated.
 
NOTE: Maps and other graphics mentioned in the text will be added as soon as I reproduce them. Due to the poor quality of the photocopy that I have, a scan of most of the maps is not feasible.
 

1. Historical Background
On 8 May 1945 (VE Day), there existed in Europe a far-flung supply system that had developed in the more than three years of American effort to defeat the Axis forces. Supplies shipped from the United States flowed through European ports to dispersed depots, from which they moved to U.S. military users and consumers.

Since the war in Europe was an allied effort, Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Forces (SHAEF) exercised general supervision over the entire supply system. For certain classes of supplies -- notably solid fuels and petroleum products -- SHAEF made the overall allocations to the several allied national forces, as well as to the civilian economies. Nevertheless, in general, supplies flowed through national supply channels, and U.S. supply policy was, for the most part, controlled by Headquarters, European Theater of Operations US Army (ETOUSA), which, like SHAEF, was commanded by General Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Operationally, U.S. wartime supply was the responsibility of the Communications Zone (COMZ), in whose Paris headquarters were the offices of the theater chiefs of services. The service chiefs exercised technical control over their service supplies and supervised the operation of base, intermediate, and advance sections. In turn, the chiefs of these sections had responsibility for the supply operations and supply installations in their designated areas.

Immediate supply support for the armies came from the COMZ Advance Section (ADSEC) and Continental Advance Section (CONAD), which extended their activities into Germany but had no area responsibility in that country. They maintained and operated the advance supply points from which the armies drew their supplies. Behind them were the intermediate and base sections, which controlled the depots and transportation lines through France and Belgium to the United Kingdom.

By reason of the rapid advances immediately before the cessation of hostilities in Europe, U.S. fighting forces had progressively increased the distance between the fighting fronts and the COMZ sources of reserve supplies. Tactical supply levels were considerably lower than those doctrinally prescribed, and Army transportation resources had to be used to a degree far beyond that normally required. In spite of these conditions, the overall supply picture was favorable, since Army objectives were realized is good order and in good time. It was, perhaps, even fortunate that reserve supplies were so far behind the tactical units because the formal capitulation of the German armed forces on 8 May 1945 so changed the character and scope of basic supply requirements that much material -- no longer needed -- had to be shipped rearward from forward areas to COMZ storage and supply installations. Further, on VE Day some U. S. forces were occupying territory from which they had to withdraw in accordance with agreements prescribing the geographical delimitations of each allied nation's zone of occupation. (See Maps 1 and 2.) The presence of large quantities of tactical reserves in these areas would have imposed a heavier post-war task.

War Department supply policy for the immediate post-war period assigned first priority to satisfying requirements in the Pacific theater of operations until the final defeat of Japan. Except for the supplies still required in the inactive European theater -- e.g., clothing, medical, and food items -- outstanding requisitions and shipment orders were to be canceled. Revised requisitions, based on requirements for occupation tasks, were to be submitted in their place.

In Germany, COMZ was responsible for providing administrative support to U.S. forces, establishing required installations, and determining the supplies and levels needed to support the occupation forces. The first depots to be relocated in Germany were issue depots established by the Advance Section, Continental Advance Section -- the two advance sections were liquidated in June and July -- Berlin District (established in May), and Bremen Port Command (established in June). Gradually, depots in southern Germany and Berlin were converted to combination filler-issue depots, and the depots in the Bremen enclave were converted to base depots.

[MAP 1]

[MAP 2]

Existing German installations were used to the maximum so as to reduce the U.S. need for new construction. When required and practical, new construction was accomplished through the use of German labor and materials.

Before the dissolution of the combined command (i.e.., SHAEF) on 14 July, General Eisenhower on 1 July redesignated ETOUSA, the highest U.S. command in the theater, as the U.S. Forces, European Theater (USFET) with a main headquarters in Frankfurt and a rear echelon (Communications Zone) in Paris. By 11 July all U.S. forces in Germany were located is the areas designated for U.S. military occupation. Two military districts were established on 1 August as the major ground force commands is German -- the Eastern Military District comprising Land Bavaria, and Western Military District comprising Land Hessen, the Bremen subdistrict, and those parts of Laender Baden and Wuerttemberg not occupied by French forces. (See Map 3. )

After these organizational changes, the U.S. Army forces had completed their transition to the status of occupation troops.

On 1 August, USFET established the Theater Services Forces, European Theater (TSFET) in Frankfurt in place of COMZ headquarters in Paris. As the mayor logistic command, TSFET exercised responsibility for all fixed installations in occupied Germany and the liberated countries and commanded all service troops.

Established at Rheims, France, an 10 December 1945 and relocated to Bad Nauheim, Germany, in early January 1946, the Continental Base Section took over the functions of TSFET, which was discontinued on 28 February 1946. The Continental Base Section provided logistic support to U.S. occupation forces in Germany and Austria, commanded the Bremen Port Command and the base and filler depots in the theater, and discharged responsibility for the bulk storage and distribution of all supplies. USFET continued to prescribe theater supply and administrative policies and retained certain logistic functions, such as determining supply disposition actions.

The immediate U.S. post-war concern in Europe had been the fulfillment of U.S. obligations under the terms of Allied agreements, and the command,

[MAP 3]

organization, disposition, and support of U.S. forces in their new role as occupants.

Considering, however, that the U.S. occupation would last for at least five years and that the presence of large numbers of unaccompanied U.S. personnel in the desolate and melancholy atmosphere of a destroyed and defeated Germany would give rise to the development of serious troop morale problems, planners envisioned the establishment of military communities, where in-theater military dependents would live and receive support at a level equal to that provided at stateside Army posts in 1937. Nearby station complement garrisons would provide services; receive, store, and issue the supplies required to sustain the military and dependent population; perform all but major maintenance services; and operate local medical and hospitalization facilities. Senior U.S. command units would distribute supplies and materials to the station complements responsible for the support of troops and dependents within the specified communities, distribute supplies directly to units and dependents unattached to a recognized community, perform major maintenance services for all occupation forces, and furnish fixed hospitalization facilities to supplement those locally available.

These military garrisons developed into the post-oriented structure, through which support was furnished to and through the post organizations. The first U.S. military dependents arrived in Europe on 29 April 1946; by 1 July their in-theater strength totaled 7,500. This strength continued to increase so that by 1 December 1952 -- the date on which USAREUR implemented the area command concept -- dependents in Europe totaled almost 70,000, some of whom were located in France as a result of an earlier U.S. decision to reestablish a French line of communications (LOC). (1)

2. Establishment of the Area Commands
Effective 1 December 1952, USAREUR changed the military post structure to realize significant manpower, material, and fund savings without, however, diminishing the quality or efficiency of the support provided under the military post concept. USAREUR consolidated the posts and subposts into area commands, which assumed the missions and responsibilities of the organizations they replaced. (See MAP 4.)

a. The Northern Area Command (NACOM). NACOM consisted of the former Frankfurt and Wuerzburg Military Posts and the Bamberg Subpost of the Nuernberg Military Post. NACOM headquarters was located at Frankfurt. Its commander was the commanding general of the former Frankfurt Military Post.

b. The Southern Area Command (SACOM). Consisting of the former Augsburg, Garmisch, Nuernberg (less Bamberg Subpost), Munich, and Stuttgart Military Posts and the Karlsruhe Subpost of the Heidelberg Military Post, the Southern Area Command had its headquarters at Munich. The commander of the former Munich Military Post was designated the SACOM commander.

c. The Western Area Command (WACOM). The geographic area of the former Rhine Military Post was designated as the Western Area Command.

d. The Headquarters Area Command (HACOM). The area comprising the former Heidelberg Military Post, less the Karlsruhe Subpost, was designated as the Headquarters Area Command.

e. Bremerhaven, Berlin, and Wiesbaden. The Bremerhaven Port of Embarkation (BPOE) continued without change. The former Berlin Military Post was redesignated the Berlin Command. The Wiesbaden Military Post, which comprised an area wherein were concentrated Air Force activities and personnel, was reorganized along lines suggested by the Twelfth Air Force, and in coordination with USAREUR's logistic planners. (2)

3. Initial Responsibilities of Commanders of Area Commands
In general, area commanders were to provide supplies and services to units, agencies, and personnel stationed within their geographic areas. Other responsibilities included the provision and administrative correlation of certain support services, such as, chaplain and radical activities; the enforcement of rules of military conduct and discipline; the control of military police activities and functions; the maintenance

[MAP 4]

of general and internal security; the preparation and ,justification of fund requirement estimates; and the performance of other general functions and services. In addition to their general courts-martial ,jurisdiction, area commanders assumed special and summary courts-martial ,jurisdiction over certain Amy personnel located within their respective areas of responsibility. (3)

In 1953, the area commands were reorganized and their detachments consolidated. Though area command missions changed slightly, the area commanders retained their principal responsibilities. (4)

4. The Southeastern Area Command (SEACOM)
Until 1953, two separate areas -- one at Garmisch, the other at Berchtesgaden -- had been known collectively as the USAREUR Recreation Area. In May of that year, the two areas were redesignated as the Southeastern Area Command. By June 1954, however, SEACOM had been discontinued, its responsibilities and functions being transferred to the Southern Area Command. The consolidation saved 16 officer and 104 enlisted spaces and simplified area support operations. (5)

5. Elimination of NACOM Districts
On 1 December 1954, NACOM eliminated its two districts and redesignated the Bamberg, Darmstadt, Frankfurt, Giessen, Hanau, Kassel, Schweinfurt, and Wuerzburg Detachments as subareas. On the same date, CINCUSAFE assumed responsibility for the administrative and logistic support of the Rhine-Main and Wiesbaden Airbases, thereby relieving the NACOM commander of these functions. The eight subareas were later incorporated into three. This organization endured until 1958. (6)

6. WACOM Reorganization
Effective 1 January 1955, WACOM discontinued its Worms Subarea and reorganized the remaining five subareas to provide services in the sector for which the Worms Subarea had been responsible. Except for the transfer of selected area support quartermaster troop support missions to Seventh Army in 1957 and 1958, this organizational arrangement endured until 1 April 1958. (7)

7. General Staff with Troop Positions
Effective 1 April 1955, CINCUSAREUR authorized the three area commanders to redesignate their G1, G2, G3, G4, and Comptroller staff positions as "general staff with troops" positions, thereby responding positively to area commanders' requests made repeatedly since the implementation of the area command concept. (8)

8. Consolidation of NACOM and HACOM
On 1 April 1958 NACOM's subareas were abolished, and HACOM was incorporated under the "12-post" concept, the 12 posts reporting directly to NACOM headquarters. The purpose of the consolidation was to save personnel and eliminate one headquarters. (9)

 

USAACOM Post Boundaries after consolidation of several NACOM posts in early 1964
 
9. Merger of SACOM and NACOM
To realize the economies directed by higher authorities and to reduce the number of Army headquarters in Europe, USAREUR proceeded to streamline the area command structure even further. As a first step USAREUR reduced the number of NACOM's posts from 12 to 7 in early 1964. Bamberg, Baumholder, Fulda, Karlsruhe, and Pirmasens Posts became subposts of Wuerzburg, Bad Kreuznach, Hanau, Heidelberg, and Kaiserslautern, respectively. Frankfurt and Giessen Posts remained unchanged. At about the same time, the number of SACOM's posts were reduced from five to four when Grafenwoehr Post was redesignated as the Seventh Arms Training Center and placed under the Nuernberg Post for area support. The status of Augsburg, Munich, and Stuttgart remained unchanged. Associated with these actions was the designation of the Armed Forces Recreation Center in Bavaria -- formerly assigned to SACOM for area support -- as a USAREUR assigned activity directly responsible to USAREUR headquarters. Because of the Center's commandwide importance and its use by members of the three component services, this arrangement was preferred to placing it under either Munich Post or directly under a consolidated headquarters.

On 1 July 1964, CINCUSAREUR discontinued SACOM headquarters at Munich and NACOM headquarters at Frankfurt and concurrently established a consolidated area command -- the U.S. Army Area Support Command (USAACOM) -- with headquarters at Frankfurt as the single command responsible for furnishing area support to U.S. Army Forces in Germany, excluding Berlin and Bremerhaven. A related development was the consolidation of all military police units of the two area commands and their assignment to a single military police group subordinate to USAACOM headquarters. The area command consolidation realized manpower savings of 133 military spaces, the military police reorganization, 727. (10)

10. Redesignation of Posts
Effective 1 July 1965, USAREUR redesignated each post a district and named it for a political subdivision of the Federal Republic or a local geographic feature, as follows:
POST DISTRICT
Augsburg South Bavaria
Bad Kreuznach Rhineland
Frankfurt Taunus
Giessen Hesse
Hanau Vogelsberg
Heidelberg North Baden
Kaiserslautern Palatinate
Nuernberg North Bavaria
Stuttgart North Wuerttemberg
Wuerzburg Franconia
   
The Munich Post, a part of the former SACOM headquarters' TDA, had been discontinued along with SACOM headquarters. Area support in the Munich area was assigned to the Munich Subpost, a subordinate element of the USAACOM's South Bavaria District Headquarters in Augsburg. At the same time USAREUR redesignated each subpost a subdivision and named it for the principal city or Landkreis (county) within its boundaries. (11)

11. The USACOMZEUR-USAACOM Merger
As a result of the relocation from France by 31 March 1967, almost all stocks and logistic activities were concentrated in Germany. It was therefore necessary to consolidate and streamline USAREUR's logistic structure to achieve the most effective and economical use of available resources. Studies analyzing the area command missions, organizational structures, and technical capabilities resulted in the conclusion that USACOMZEUR should absorb USAACOM's functions. USACOMZEUR had been performing area support missions in France and could absorb USAACOM's responsibilities -- even during the immediate post-FRELOC transition period -- without disrupting its other logistic operations. Despite the loss of the LOC through France, USACOMZEUR's area support missions had not changed significantly. USACOMZEUR was still providing through its NATO/SHAPE Support Group -- area support to international headquarters in the BENELUX area, as well as to its personnel in the United Kingdom.

The merger of the two commands at USACOMZEUR headquarters, Worms, Germany, an 1 July 1967 brought about a series of internal organizational and staffing modifications, which included establishing the position of the Deputy Commander for Area Support and converting the heads of general staff divisions to deputy chiefs of staff. The Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics was assigned responsibility for the installation-and-service-type functions formerly administered by two separate divisions. Completed by 30 September, the merger resulted in the saving of 728 personnel spaces --225 military, 99 U.S. civilian, and 404 local national (LN). The merged headquarters had, at the time of the merger, a personnel ceiling authorization of 854 spaces.

Earlier in the year, in May 1967, the U.S. Army Engineer Command, Europe (Provisional), had assumed the repairs and utilities (R&U) technical supervision mission formerly assigned to USAACOM. Effective 1 July 1967, the U.S. Army Traffic Management Agency, Central Europe (USATMACE) consolidated the traffic management and movements control activities. (12)

12. Project CORD
Even before the completion of the USACOMZEUR-USAACOM merger, logistic planners had turned their attention to reorganizing and streamlining the 10 support districts. This effort -- later designated Project CORD (COMZ Organizational Realignment of Districts) -- called for a 2-phase program. The first-phase objective, attained on 1 December 1967, was to establish a standardized district organization. (See Chart 1.) The second-phase objective was the consolidation of the 10 remaining

[GRAPHIC 1]

districts into 5, their boundaries to coincide with those of the Federal Republic's Laender (states).

These changes were necessary because the former USAACOM district organizations had no semblance of uniformity and did not reflect current support responsibilities, facility and manpower needs, or the number of personnel supported. District boundaries, which had been established under conditions that no longer obtained, had to be realigned to provide area support to U.S. forces in the Germany of the late 1960's.

Planners had explored the possibility of creating depot complexes, such as those that had functioned successfully in France. Under that concept, the complex commander was responsible not only for the depots and maintenance facilities but also the support of members of the forces present in his area. The merger of the Hessen District (an area support organization) and the U.S. Army Giessen Depot (a storage and maintenance installation) in December 1967 was an experimental application of the depot complex concept in Germany. However, conditions in Germany were not the same as those in France, where almost all Army personnel were assigned to USACOMZEUR. In Germany, most troops were assigned to USAREUR and Seventh Army, so that the complex concept could not be applied without modification.

The consolidation of the districts -- redesignated Support Districts (SUPDISTs), the former subdistricts being redesignated Support Activities (SUPACTs) -- became effective 1 July 1968. SUPDIST Hessen, with headquarters at Frankfurt, included the former districts of Giessen, Taunus, and Vogelsberg. SUPDIST Baden-Wuerttemberg, with headquarters at Stuttgart, incorporated the former North Baden and North Wuerttemberg Districts. SUPDIST Rhineland-Pfalz, with headquarters at Kaiserslautern, combined the former Rhineland and Palatinate Districts. SUPDIST Nord Bayern, with headquarters at Nuernberg, incorporated the former Franconia and North Bavaria Districts. SUPDIST Sued Bayern, with headquarters at Augsburg, remained unchanged. (See MAP 5.)

[MAP 5]

The new organization authorized a total of 33 subdivision (i.e., SUPACT) headquarters, as opposed to only 27 before Project CORD. (See TABLE 1.) The increase was explained by the need to establish SUPACT headquarters at sites where former district headquarters had been eliminated and to improve the support of dispersed U.S. personnel in the larger SUPDIST. The implementation of Project CORD saved 333 manpower spaces. The new support strengths at each district were as follows: (13)
 
OFF
WO
EM
DAC
LN
LS
 
TOTALS
407
7
1,007
330
12,274
69
14,094
Rheinland Pfalz
94
1
248
54
2,606
--
3,003
Hessen
92
2
229
84
2,557
62
3,026
Nord Bayern
71
1
172
54
2,218
--
2,516
Sued Bayern
58
1
106
48
2,079
--
2,292
Baden Wuerttemberg
92
2
252
90
2,814
7
3,257
 
13. Establishment of SUPDIST Bremerhaven
In addition to its principal mission, the U.S. Army Transportation Terminal Command, Europe, with headquarters at Bremerhaven, furnished area support and services to U.S. personnel in northern Germany, an area outside the designated geographic limits of USTASCOMEUR's (14) northernmost SUPDIST (Hessen). This arrangement endured to early 1969, when, as a result of several studies on reorganizing port operations in Europe, USTASCOMEUR began to streamline its operations in the Bremerhaven area. For this purpose it separated the port and support functions through the simultaneous establishment on 1 October 1969 of the U.S. Army Transportation Terminal Group (Provisional) -- which replaced the former U.S. Army Transportation Terminal Command, Europe -- and the U.S. Forces Support District, Bremerhaven (Provisional). The Group was assigned to USATRANSCOMEUR, a USTASCOMEUR functional command; the SUPDIST to USTASCOMEUR headquarters. (15) (See MAP 6.)

[TABLE 1]

[MAP 6]

Effective 30 June 1971, USTASCOMEUR redesignated the SUPDIST, Bremerhaven, as the U.S. Forces Support District, Norddeutschland, thereby bringing its official designation in line with the practice, established in July 1968, of assigning German, rather than English, area classifications. (16)

14. Area Support in 1970
USTASCOMEUR's six SUPDISTs and 33 SUPACTs continued to provide supply and service support to approximately 350,000 U.S. military and civilian personnel, including dependents. Area support facilities included 41,394 family housing units -- one-third of the Army's worldwide assets -- and 3,428 bachelor officer's quarters (BOQ) units; 68 commissary sales outlets; 88 open messes; 66 troop messes; 88 service clubs; 9 stock record accounts; 10 laundry and drycleaning plants; 39 clothing sales stores; 77 motor pools; 9 audio-visual centers; 34 finance offices; 223 crafts shops; 63 maintenance shops; 105 dependent schools; 108 libraries; 125 gymnasiums, and 149 chapels. Support of dependent schools included the operation and maintenance of 623 school buses. (17)
 

1. For more detailed information see: (1) Occupation Forces in Europe Series 1945 - 1946, The First Year, Parts I-IV, V, and V (Cont); (2) LTC J.C. Bagg, "Area Commands in Germany," The Quartermaster Review, Sep-Oct 61 (hereafter cited as Area Commands in Germany); (3) USAREUR ODCSOPS Chronology of U.S. Ground Forces in Europe (1943 - June 1971). ALL UNCLAS.
 
2. (1) USAREUR ltr of instr, 27 Oct 52. (2) USAREUR GOs 27, 27 Oct 52, and 40, 15 Dec 52. (3) USAREUR Cir 84, 1 Dec 52. ALL UNCLAS.
 
3. USAREUR Cir 140, 31 Oct 52. UNCLAS.
 
4. NACOM Rept, 29 Oct 53, subj: Organization and Functional Survey, 29 Oct 53. UNCLAS.
 
5. (1) USAREUR Anl Hist Rept, 1 Jan 53-30 Jun 54, p.25. SECRET (info used UNCLAS). (2) USAREUR GO 45, 27 May 53. UNCLAS.
 
6. (1) NACOM GO 89, 3 Nov 54. (2) Area Commands in Germany. Both UNCLAS.
 
7. WACOM GO 33, 20 Dec 54. UNCLAS.
 
8. USAREUR Anl Hist Rept, FY 55, p.23. SECRET (info used UNCLAS).
 
9. (1) USAREUR Anl Hist Rept, FY 58, p.14. SECRET (info used UNCLAS). (2) Area Commands in Germany. UNCLAS. (3) USAREUR Anl Hist Rept, FY 59, p.8. TS (info used UNCLAS). (4) USAREUR Ops Div Hist Div Draft Outline, n.d., subj: Logistical and Administrative Support Organization in the European Theater, 1952-1961. UNCLAS.
 
10. (1) USAREUR GOs 237, 245, and 271, 15, 19, and 29 Jun 64. (2) USAREUR Reg 10-5, 1 Jul 64, subj: Designations of Commands, Units, and Activities of the United States Army, Europe. ALL UNCLAS. (3) USAREUR Anl Hist Sum, 1964, pp.4-6. TS (info used UNCLAS).
 
11. (1) USAREUR GO 119, 5 May 65. UNCLAS. (2) USAREUR Anl Hist Sum, 1965, pp.14-15. TS (info used UNCLAS).
 
12. (1) USAREUR Anl Hist Sum, 1967, pp.1-4. (2) USACOMZEUR Anl Hist Sum, 1967. Vol. 1, pp.384-508. Both SECTRET (info used UNCLAS).
 
13. USTASCOMEUR AnlHist Sum, 1968, pp.106-134. SECRET (info used UNCLAS).
 
14. USACOMZEUR was redesignated as the Theater Army Support Command, Europe (USTASCOMEUR), and reorganized on 25 April 1969.
 
15. (1) USTASCOMEUR Anl Hist Sum, 1969, p.103; and 1970, p.123. SECRET (info used UNCLAS). (2) USTASCOMEUR GO 245, 16 Oct 69. UNCLAS.
 
16. The Stars and Stripes (Eur ed.), 25 Jun 71. UNCLAS.
 
17. USTASCOMEUR Anl Hist Sum, 1969, p.72. SECRET (info used UNCLAS).

 
(Source: Email from William H. Pfahl, 547th Ord Co, 1964-66)
Came across the Area Command web page this evening. I served with the 547th Ord Co of the Area Command. I have been searching for the unit I served in from 1964-66.

About 1990 I had the occasion to travel to Rothwesten Kaserne (Kassel area), Hesse. The unit and in fact the entire US presence there had been vacated and the post given back to the German Army.


I suspected that the 547th had been inactivated. Was wondering what happened to some of the unit's baubles. Specifically, there was an Ordnance Bomb with the flame attached adjacent to the shop facility. The bomb was quite large, 3 to 4 feet in diameter. At the time of my posting, the Unit had been in Rothwesten for a year or so. Prior to that the Company was in La Rochelle, France.

Our mission was to support three transportation companies hauling goods from Bremerhaven (the US port) to the American sector in Germany. It was arduous work as the transport companies were using tactical vehicles for 4 to 500 mile trips. Later on – I believe sometime in 1965 - the transports were given “over the road” civilian trucks.

When posted, the Company was under Com Z command. This shift was credited to our Commander, a Capt/Major Stevens (I can't recall his first name). At that time Area Command was located in Munich with logistics from Giessen. The 547th then took the additional responsibility for maintenance of all Rothwesten units (a Bn of ASA and one battery of HAWK missiles). Hence the shift to Area Command.

That is all the information I can recall at this time. You must also understand that the information here is heresay, as memory tends to fade with time. Any additional info you can provide would be most appreciated. Specifically, it is my understanding that the Unit had been in ETO since WWII and that it has several battle streamers.

COMMAND NEWSPAPERS
NOTE: I plan to post extracts from the command, unit and community newspapers sometime in the near future - if I see that there is any interest. Click on thumbnail of newspaper to read the front page.
The Chronicle - Some of the issues published while in Germany




 
US Army Area Command
 

IG Farben Building, initial headquarters for US Army Area Command, 1964 (Charles Merk)
 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, June 26, 1964)
On July 1, 1964 US Army Area Command (USAACom) will formally be activated at Frankfurt to replace Northern Area Command (NACom) and Southern Area Command (SACom). The new consolidated support and service command will be headquartered at the IG Farben Building and assume responsibility for the missions, areas and functions of these two organizations. First CO of the new command will be Col Louis Gershenow (current CO of NACom).

The boundaries of the current NACom and SACom posts remain unchanged except for Nuernberg Post which will now include Bamberg Sub-Post. SACom HQ will become Munich Post on July 1.

USAACom will be organized into 11 post areas. These posts and their commanders are:
  Post Commanding Officer  
  Augsburg Col John W. Finn  
  Bad Kreuznach Col John N. Schoming  
  Frankfurt Col John J. Moore  
  Giessen Lt Col Victor K. Harwood (acting CO)  
  Hanau Lt Col Rocco F. Meconi  
  Heidelberg Col James T. L. Schwenk  
  Kaiserslautern Col Francis Daugherty  
  Munich Col Guy O. DeYoung, Jr.  
  Nuernberg Col S. A. Armogida  
  Stuttgart Col George P. Nichols  
  Wuerzburg Col George B. Jordan  

(Source: STARS & STRIPES, June 27, 1966)
Aviation Section, USAACom

The Aviation Section of US Army Area Command was formed in August 1964.

The unit comprises one fixed-wing aircraft, a U-8D SEMINOLE (until 1962, known as the L-23D). Two pilots (Capt Marvin E. Humphrey, section chief, and 1st Lt William F. Reilly, Jr.) and two ground crew (Spec 5 Charles Cable, crew chief, and Spec 4 Joseph E. Harbinson, mechanic) are assigned to the section.

The Section uses a hangar on the German air base at Neubiberg (south of McGraw Kaserne) as its home base.

 
(Source: STATION LIST, June 1966)
  DISTRCT STATION  
  HHC, Area Command McGraw Kaserne, Munich  
  Franconia Leighton Barracks, Wuerzburg  
  Hesse Pendleton Barracks, Giessen  
  North Baden Hammonds Barracks, Seckenheim  
  North Wuerttemberg Robinson Barracks, Stuttgart  
  Palatinate Panzer Kaserne, Kaierslautern  
  Rhineland Bad Kreuznach  
  South Bavaria Reese Barracks, Augsburg  
  Taunus 3804 Kaserne, Frankfurt  
  Vogelsberg Pioneer Kaserne, Hanau  

(Source: Email from Larry R Ward, Det 1, SSU, Frankfurt)

I served in Det 1 of the USA Signal Service Unit, IG Farben Bldg, Frankfurt, APO 09757 from July 1963/Dec 1965. I was wondering if that unit is still active and working? We were part of the Northern Area Command at the time, and had several detachments in various cities in West Germany.

We were "part of" the Northern Area Command (NACOM), and ran a large communications center in the IG FARBEN bldg. in Frankfurt, and our barracks were in a small Kaserne a short distance away. The Det #1 housed a comm. center section, radio operations sections, and both included their own maintenance sections if I remember correctly. There was also a telephone repair and installation section. There were several Detachments to the group (five, six or seven ?). I remember Frankfurt, Munich, Nuremburg, Stuttgart, Kaiserslautern. There were possibly others, but I do not recall them.

I was a Crypto operator, so my work place was highly classified as was the type of work I did.

I do seem to recall that the Unit's Commander's rank was Brigader General/Bird Colonel?? It has been so long ago, I cannot remember a lot of details. I have had not contact with any of the men I served with since my discharge.

I found your email on an US Army Europe web page that listed some Signal Corp outfits that were in service in Europe; They listed a US Army Strategic Communications Command (USASCC) as USASCC-Eur SSU as working out of the IG Farben bldg. in Frankfurt, possibly as part of a Command and Control Battation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Webmaster Notes: I found mention of several Signal Service Units, all reporting to HQ USA Area Command, in the USAREUR STATION LIST for Sept 1965:

Sig Svc Unit, Frankfurt, APO 09757 (Unit ID - W1QS-AA-A)
Sig Svc Unit, Kaiserslautern, APO 09227 (Unit ID - W1RJ-AA-A)
Sig Svc Unit, Munich, APO 09407 (Unit ID - W1QT-AA-A)
Sig Svc Unit, Nuernberg, APO 09696 (Unit ID - W1QU-AA-A)
Sig Svc Unit, Stuttgart, APO 09154 (Unit ID - W1QV-AA-A)

Who can shed some light on the organization and mission of these signal units?


 
Northern Area Command
 
The Northern Area Command was established in Frankfurt, Germany, on December 1, 1952, pursuant to General Order 27, USAREUR, October 27, 1952. It replaced the Frankfurt Military Post. Its jurisdiction initially included the districts of Frankfurt and Würzburg.

On March 1, 1959, it gained from the discontinued Western Area Command the districts of Baumholder, Bad Kreuznach, Pirmasens, Worms, Mainz, Kaiserslautern, and Koblenz.

The Northern Area Command was discontinued on July 1, 1964, in accordance with General Order 192, USAREUR, May 14, 1964, with functions transferred to the U.S. Army Area Command.
 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, 30 Nov 1963)
NACom to Celebrate 11th Anniversary
By RALPH BENNINGTON
Staff Writer

FRANKFURT (S&S) - The Northern Area Comd (NACom) celebrates its 11th anniversary Sunday at headquarters here and throughout the 12 posts and 12 subposts that fall under the largest Army area command in Europe.

While Frankfurt has been a major Army center since the end of World War II and known as everything from the Frankfurt Compound to Frankfurt Military Post, the NACom designation did not come into being until Dec. 1, 1952.

Encompassing more than 36,000 miles of territory extending from the Luxembourg and France borders to the East Zone of Germany in the northeast and above Kassel in the north, NACom provides garrison-type, logistical and administrative support to an American military community of more than a quarter of a million.

NACom Telephone Directory
NACom supplies support for such major units as USAREUR Hq, V Corps, 7th Army Support Comd and three divisions -- the 3rd Inf, 3rd Armd and 8th Inf. It also acts as landlord and corner grocer, city administrator and recreation supervisor for the complete community of servicemen, wives, children and civilians.

Along this line there are 82 chapels, 51 service clubs, 71 libraries, 74 theaters, 69 bowling lanes, 70 gymnasiums and 602 other sports facilities. In addition there are 72 education centers for the American community plus 45 elementary and high schools with an enrollment of 33,000.

There are 72 housing areas and 100,000 troop barracks spaces to maintain plus providing utilities for more than 200 separate installations.

The 12 main posts directly under NACom are: Giessen, Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Wuerzburg, Bamberg, Fulda, Hanau, Bad Kreuznach, Baumholder, Pirmasens, Kaiserslautern and Karlsruhe. The 12 sub-posts are Mainz, Schweinfurt, Darmstadt, Bad Hersfeld, Bad Kissingen, Wildflecken, Kassel, Gelnhausen, Worms, Aschaffenburg, Kitzingen and Wertheim.

 
(Source: Email from William Moorehead)
74th Army Postal Unit

I was stationed with the 74th from Sept.1, 1959 til April 2, 1962. After Postal School I was sent to Fort Dix, NJ for 3 weeks OJT with the 22nd Base Post Office. Then was sent to Germany on the USNS Upshur and came home on the USNS Rose.

The 74th had One Postal Officer and 16 enlisted men of which 3 men were stationed at Zweibruecken and operated APO 872. We also had 2 one-man units. Unit 1 was in the basement of one of the buildings in the dependent housing area just down from the PX and Unit 2 was in Muenchweiler at the 225th Station Hospital. I was assigned to Unit 1 from Oct 1959 thru March 1962. I also worked Unit 2 a few times.

The 74th Army Postal Unit was responsible for providing mail service to the Army Units in and around Pirmasens also to the dependents. We received our mail from APO 227 in Kaiserslautern which acted as our Base Post Office until the Berlin Crisis and then the 22nd Base Post Office was set up in Kaiserslautern and we got our mail from them.

I do know that the 22nd was in Manila in the Philippines during WWII and that the 74th & 70th Postal Units were in that area. Best I that I can remember, the 70th Army Postal Unit operated APO 227. I know the Company Commander of the 22nd Base Post Office when it was in Manila, and some of the men that were in the 22nd.

I would like to know more history on the 74th Army Postal Unit and if it is still active.

7772 SIGNAL SERVICE COMPANY -- later redesignated as SSU, Frankfurt
 
(Source: Email from Bob Mathewes, 7772 AU, 1955-56)

The 7772 AU was the Northern Area Command Signal Service Company. Technically our CO was the NACOM Signal Officer. That was a “Bird” Colonel”. We seldom saw him. An Adjutant who was a Lieutenant ran the company.

I got there in early 1955. I was fresh out of the Southeastern Signal School at Camp Gordon in Augusta, GA. My MOS was Teletype Repair (I think the number was 2615).

We shipped over on the USNS General W. G. Haan. On 1 March we stopped in Southampton to disembark some personnel. (I still have the ship newsletter from that day.) From there, it was on to Bremerhaven. I was really glad to get my feet on dry land. I was sea sick most of the way. I remember seeing ice in the harbor and thinking that this was not something a South Carolina boy was accustomed to.

We loaded on a train and rode all night to the replacement center in Zweibrücken. My fondest recollection of that stop was the wonderful breakfast. It was the first meal and almost two weeks that I really enjoyed.

From Zweibrücken we went all over Europe. I traveled by train to Frankfurt am Main, arriving at the Hauptbahnhof about dark. I heard someone shouting, “Who’s for the Deuce”. I didn’t know what the hell the “Deuce” was so I didn’t respond. It wasn’t until he said , “the 7772" that I knew he was looking for us (I think there were three of us). We loaded into a ¾-ton truck for the ride out. The men we were replacing hadn’t rotated yet so they bunked us in the supply room in the basement.

Our barracks were near those of the 97th General Hospital although they were not behind the wire with the 97th. We were actually in the Atterbury Housing area. We shared the building with the 7770 Quartermaster SV Det. I have no memory of that other than the sign in one of the attached photos. I do remember there was another outfit in the far end of the building.

Although our HQ was in Frankfurt, we had detachments in other places but I don’t remember where. In Frankfurt, our people worked in the Communications Center in the Headquarters building downtown. That was the old I.G. Farben Building. We had a small Signal Corps warehouse and maintenance facility within a short walk of our barracks. That was where I worked. We repaired radios and teletype equipment. Our main maintenance people were about equally divided between GIs & German civilians. The NCOIC for the maintenance side was SFC Maxwell and the NCOIC in the warehouse was Staff Sgt. Robert Johnson. Our AOR ran from Darmstadt in the south to Kassel in the north. I remember we also had a photo lab but I was never there.

Later on, they moved us behind the wire with the 97th General Hosp. people. We had service calls at all hours and now we had to account for our late night comings and goings to a sentry at the gate. We didn’t have that problem in the old barracks and none of us like it.

Shortly after my arrival we swapped our American made ¾-ton trucks for German built Ford Taunus vans. I remember we had to put sandbags over the rear wheels in the winter to keep the rear end from sliding. On cold nights, someone was detailed to start them all every hour.

We ate our meals at a consolidated mess at Gibbs Barracks. There was a theater, EM Club and snack bar within rock throwing distance of our barracks. A block or so away was Herbie’s Gasthaus. You could still see along the side of Herbie’s building where it had been stitched by a machine gun.

I was there until May or June of 1956 when I rotated back. Every man in the outfit who came back to the ZI while I was there came by air. When it came my turn they sent me by sea.

I don’t have anything in the way of a roster I can give you some names and hometowns from notes on my pictures. My closest friends were Kenneth L. Davis of Hays City, Kansas; Jim Kerns of Storm Lake, Iowa and Bob Greenawalt of PA.


The aerial above shows the Betts Housing area (1970s) - this is where the 7772 AU was billeted in the 1950s. Several of Bob's photos presented below show scenes from the area in the mid-1950s .
 

NACom Sig Sv Co
Frankfurt

 

1. Reed & Mathewes next to Ford Taunus sedan (KB)

2. 7772 AU and 7770 QM Sv Co signs (KB)

3. Ford Taunus vans (KB)


4. IG Farben Building, 1955 (KB)

5. Looking towards the Snack Bar (KB)

6. EM Club (KB)
 

7. Theater No. 3 (KB)

8. EM Club, Gibbs Bks (KB)

9. "New" barracks (KB)
 

10. Ready for inspection (KB)

11. Harry Butler (left) (KB)

12. Sparky (KB) - Sparky was the company mascot. He was terribly afraid of rifle fire. He would go to the range with us and disappear at the first shot. We would find him at the barracks when we got back. He was a real ham. He would assume this pose any time a camera was pointed at him and hold it until the shutter clicked.
 

 
(Source: Email from Robert (Scott) Alexander)
I was stationed in Frankfurt from 1956-1957 in the IG Hochhaus. I was part of the Northern Area Command and we operated a telephone system that connected military bases in the Northern Area Command.  If you have any information about my group I would appreciate it.  Just wanted to say thanks for all you have done with your website, it truly is a wonderful to see all of areas again.
 
I have your email and I will attempt to answer your questions as best my 73 year old memory can do.

To the best of my knowledge, the Northern Area Command was an organization set up to do house keeping duties for units of the Seventh Army and in the Northern Area of V Corps of the 7th Army.

Hitler had barracks in many small towns in Germany which were called Kasernes. Our troops occupied many of these barracks in anticipation that the “balloon would go up” (the Russians would attack West Germany}. This was in 1956 and 1957.

Ike had left the I.G. Hochhaus and was then President of the USA. The Hochhaus was then V Corps headquarters of the 7th Army. Their headquarters troops were billeted in a barracks in Frankfurt, the name of which I have forgotten, not too far from the Hochhaus where our company of troops was also billeted.

Our office was on the first floor of the Hochhaus. I had a large manual switchboard on the 7th floor, or attic, of the Hochhaus. The operators were all German nationals employed by the Army although I had a Master Sgt. in charge. I reported to Captain Ishmael Benton who reported to a Major who reported to a Lt. Colonel. Our secretary was a very nice German lady.

We provided fixed plant communications for V Corps fighting units. We had dial exchanges in the barracks that Hitler’s troops had occupied, and they were connected by a dial network which was good for it’s time. All circuits were leased from the Deutsche Bundespost, which is the German post office, that operates the German telephone system. Many of our workers were German nationals supervised by military personnel.

The equipment we used was all German, usually manufactured by Siemens und Halske, now known as Siemens. We also had some equipment from a firm by the name of Telefonbau und Normalzeit AG. I went to a school put on by this company for US troops, explaining how their switching equipment worked. T und N also manufactured vending machines.

We also operated some sort of a radio network which was for emergency use only. We tested it nightly. We also operated a Com Center which had full encryption capabilities. I do not remember who the traffic was for but I presume V Corps since it was across the street from their barracks. I was not involved in this operation and never did know much about it.

Most of the engineers for these activities, except the com center, were German nationals, some of whom had been in the German military. We also had U.S. civilians who had it so good that some of them were happy not to be on US soil.

Occasionally we had to stand duty officer for the Northern Area Command. The chief duty was to report the arrival, or not, of the supply convoy that returned nightly from Berlin to West Germany. Sometimes the Russians would stop it and we had to report it to someone.

If the balloon went up, our duty was to take military dependents and civilians out of the area to somewhere west in convoys. We were to keep our cars ½ full of gas at all times which we bought from the army at 17 cents per gallon. They wanted us to use a lot because all of the military vehicles ran on gas at that time and the gas only kept for so long. My weapon was a US carbine, caliber 30, M1.

As a matter of interest, floors 3 or 4 though 6 of the Hochhaus were full of “spooks.” No one knew who they worked for or what they did. They all wore civilian clothes and dressed like Germans. If a telephone was needed we had to deliver it to an entrance and their com people took it from there.

I hope this helps you in your quest for information. It has caused me to think of things not thought of for many years. It is nice to know someone might be interested.

(Source: Email from Gene Kitchens, 7772 Sig Svc Co, 1958-60)
Just found your web site. Enjoyed reading some of the info on Gibbs Barracks and the units assigned there. I was assigned to the 7772 Signal Service Company from April 1958 to April 1960 at Gibbs Barracks. I worked at the transmitter site (NACOM Radio Station).

I have been trying to remember the street names on how we got to the NACOM Radio Station site for decades, but I just cannot remember. It's funny how you can drive somewhere at least 4 times a day and not remember the names of the streets. I know we usually left Gibbs out the back gate through the Gibbs Housing Area. After that we traveled on several different streets (I believe east) until we came to a farming area. It was really out in the boon-docks. There were no other military installations anywhere close by. Took about 30 minutes to get there from Gibbs (much longer if it was snowing or foggy).

We referred to the NACOM Radio Station as the transmitter site, but it was also a receiver station. It was just the way we referred to the site. We thought of a radio station as something you listen to while in your car. The Army called it a radio station, we called it the transmitter site. Sort of like the official name was Gibbs Barracks, but I never heard anyone call it anything other than Gibbs Kaserne. NACOM radio station was a complete radio station. It was voice and morse code. Mostly morse code.

The first week of April 1960, as I was getting ready to leave Frankfurt, the NACOM radio station was being moved to the top floor of the Farben building. The old site was apparently abandoned, or given back to the farmers. I never worked in the Farben building. They were just bringing the equipment over and installing everything when I left.

I believe the radio station was just a backup site in case something happened to the Farben building. Since I was not an operator, don't hold me to this, but I seem to remember sometimes the operators would get a message via teletype to relay that message on to all of the other stations on the net, but mostly the operators just seem to practice their morse code and would send practice messages back and forth to each other.

Many posts in NACOM were on the radio net with our radio station. I'm not sure how many, but I know at least five, probably more. Every hour I remember the radio operators were required to call each station by morse code and log their response as to signal strength and probably to see if they were still awake. Our station was the HQ. Our call sign was JW. The other stations had call signs of JW1, JW2, JW3, etc. It must have been tough to stay awake especially on the midnight shift. It was really lonely out there all by yourself. Only 1 radio operator worked each shift.

Gibbs was used just for billeting, and of course we ate there also. The 7772nd Sig. Svc. Co. had no communication center of its own. Some members of the unit did work at a comm ctr. in the Farben building. That is where I believe the main teletype communications of NACOM was set up. The 7772nd was just as the name suggests, a service company. Members worked at many different locations around Frankfurt doing jobs such as Radio Repair, Radio Operator, Teletype Repair. Lineman, Antenna repairs and installation, etc. One person ran the MARS station in the Farben building.

During my 2 years at Gibbs, the members assigned to the radio station were mostly billeted at Gibbs. However for about 6 months we actually lived at the radio station and came into Gibbs for our meals. The cooks at Gibbs had box lunches left out at breakfast for those who could not return for lunch like the radio operators. Many times I would also pick up a box lunch so I didn't have to make the trip back. The radio station had a refrigerator and stove we could use. That was an experiment that I guess the powers to be had second thoughts about, so they had us move back to Gibbs.  We loved it while it lasted however. We lived there about the same time that I was assigned along with 1 operator to man a 1 1/2 ton communications truck. This truck included communication equipment that one could only imagine having. We brought up the rear of a convoy that practiced occasionally to evacuate civilian personnel if needed. I guess the commies were acting up then.

7772 Sig Sv Co
Frankfurt
Who can help identify where the transmitter site was located?
 

1. NACOM Radio Station (KB)

2. Operations Bldg (KB)

3. BC610 transmitters (KB)


4. 7772 Sig vans (KB)

5. Main gate (KB)

6. Barracks bldg on right (KB)
 

7. A wintery day (KB)

8. NCO and EM Clubs (KB)

 
 
 

 
(Source: Email from Don Follett, 7772 Sig Svc Co, 1957-58)
I recently reviewed the photos and stories about the Northern Area Command. Great job.

I served in Frankfurt from Feb. 1957 to Oct. 1958. Along with Alexander I served with the 7772 Signal Svc Co and was the admin-budget officer with many other duties. We provided telephone, radio, and photo fixed installation support to many V Corp units. We maintained a large photo lab and signal maintenance shop.  

Northern Area Command was commanded then by MG Paul D. Adams from mid-1957 to mid 1958, when he was dispatched to Beirut Lebanon, I believe to be in command of all land troops in that action. He took a few signal support people with him. LTG Farrell was the V Corps commander.

As always, the budget was a big concern each fiscal year; usually the original allocation at our level was reduced at mid-year. Ordinary quartermaster items and vehicle maintenance such as coal were big items.

Recreation: The area was a mecca for military sports with several former big league ball players; good football too. Frankfurt High School had competitive teams as well.

I remember big time entertainment came through the town: Johnny Ray, Harry James, Sarah Vaughn; Elvis Presley was assigned to Bad Nauheim, I believe.

Alexander was right about the com center in which there were multiple teletype transmitters, and we did some microwave work. A lot of administrative traffic, i.e. quartermaster and other tech service supplies. I remember those Taunus wire trucks. We repaired smaller radio equipment for V Corps. Again, mostly fixed installations, building and post phones and switchboards. Very little, if any, of the tactical units mobile communications. ie the 3d Armored Division had a signal battalion with repair capability. I know, as a junior officer I wound up signing the property book for some 45 telephone exchanges at the various posts and subposts. Without seeing them --- violating a rule I was taught at Officer basic training. We also operated the MARS facility for Frankfurt (kind of ham operator/station to US and home stations). I expect V Corps signal did the interface with 7th Army.  About a year before I left, V Corps sent over an interim Signal Officer (from the IG Farben Bldg)  to command the NACOM Signal Division.

As a journalism major in college, I was somewhat out of my element. Looking back, I was fortunate to have served with some outstanding signal field operations officers, many of whom who had served in WW II. There were many lieutentants, of course, who were learning along with me. My skills may have been with the photography end of things, but not necessarily the heavy work orders we processed for copy work, and portrait, IG and provost marshal photo support.

I went to Off basic at Fort Monmouth in a class of 27, including 25 engineering grads, mostly electrical engineers.  After discharge, I went home to the States and to Indiana where I joined the Indiana Guard, 38th Inf Div. Later, I joined the Infantry Reserve component in Minnesota, retiring from the USAR some 30 years later. I wouldn't have predicted that when I was back in Frankfurt.

 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, May 4, 1960)
Heidelberg Signal Branch, NACom

The Signal Br provides telephone, teletype, and pictorial services to the Heidelberg and Karlsruhe Posts. It also provides film equipment, and signal supply and maintenance support to the two military posts.

The organization is staffed with two officers and 45 enlisted men. It is located at Funari Barracks in Mannheim.

 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, May 16, 1961)
There are Northern Area Command major tape relay stations at Frankfurt, Kaiserslautern and Mannheim. They are all important links in STARCOM -- the strategic (global) Army communications network.

The teletype network operates under the supervision of the NACom Signal Division.

The Frankfurt tape relay station is located in the I.G. Farben Building and provides around-the-clock classified teletype facilities for the NACom Commander and the commanders of lodger units in Frankfurt. (Lodger ...

Station staff consists of one officer, one DAC, 35 enlisted men and nine local nationals. (DAC ... Department of the Army Civilian)

The average time for "originating traffic" is 19 minutes (from the time it is delivered to the communications center to the time it is actually punched out on the teletype for circuit transmission).

"Transmission time" is 2 minutes - the time it takes to relay a message station to station.

(Source: STARS & STRIPES, February 20, 1962)
The NACom Signal Service Unit is responsible for providing fixed wire, radio, pictorial and (signal) maintenance support for Northern Area Command.

Its area of responsibility covers more than 22,500 square miles and includes 12 posts and 13 sub-posts. The unit provides support to headquarters NACom, NACom posts and sub-posts, as well as units assigned or attached to NACom and lodger units within the AOR. That support includes operating telephone exchanges, tape relay centers, photo laboratories, film libraries and maintenance and supply centers.

There are 37,484 telephones installed in NACom with 78 dial exchanges. One-third of the telephones is controlled from the IG Farben Building in Frankfurt with twenty-two exchanges coming from the central exchange on the seventh floor.

In the tape relay center located in the basement of the IG Farben Bldg close to 40,000 messages are handled each month. (The theater's largest tape relay center, at Pirmasens, is also located within the AOR of NACom. This center, however, comes under the direct control of STRATCOM. All messages coming into Europe go through this tape relay center first.

Air-ground communications at the 25 airfields in NACom is also a responibility of the SSU.

The film library at Heddernheim is one of the largest in the Army, with more than 4,000 films. (A projectionist school is run there also.)

The NACom film laboratory is also located at Heddernheim.

There are six signal detachments that fall under the SSU -- The largest detachment being the Frankfurt Signal Det.

 
Southern Area Command
 
(Source: Welcome Brochure, HQ SACom, 1955)

SACom Welcome Brochure


SACom Telephone Directory


HQ SACom Strip Map, 1964
SACom ROSTER OF KEY PERSONNEL (as of 6 July 1955)
Commander Maj Gen Numa A. Watson
Deputy Comdr Col George O. Pearson
Chief of Staff Lt Col Roy W. Marcy
AC of S G1 Lt Col James A. Scott
AC of S G2 Lt Col I. R. Lampman
AC of S G3 Lt Col Joseph Gorman
AC of S G4 Col George W. Hanley
Comptroller Mr. A Litwin (acting)
Civil Affairs Capt James G. Franzen
Adj. General Lt Col Wilfred Arnold Jr.
Provost Marshal Col Homer Widmann
Special Service Maj Albert A. Price
Chaplain Col Peter S. Rush
Hq Commandant Capt Alexander Vorobyoff
Civilian Personnel Mr. Robert G. Beers
Inspector General Lt Col Herman R. Cowen
Judge Advocate Lt Col Hesse M. Charlton Jr.
Public Information Capt Howard H. Ossermann
Labor Service Lt Col Nelson C. Wahlgreen
Engineer Col William H. McGreary
Quartermaster Lt Col James V. Loftus
Signal Lt Col Delos S. Calkins
Transportation Lt Col Clayton L. Mausert
Ordnance Lt Col Bernice F. Jones
Chemical Capt Wendell R. Chastain
Surgeon Col George Horsfall
Dental Col Martin F. Sullivan
Visitor's Bureau Capt Henry L. Brooks

SACom SUB-AREA COMMANDERS
(as of 6 July 1955)
Augsburg Col Sylvester T. Del Corso
Berchtesgaden Lt Col Thomas D. McPhail
Garmisch Col Noble J. Wiley Jr
Grafenwöhr Col Walter R. Nichlos
Hohenfels Col Ralph L. Webb
Munich Lt Col Harry N. Payne
Nürnberg Col Alexander G. Kirby
Schwäbisch Hall Col Winthrop H. Rogers
Straubing Lt Col Andrew Blase
Stuttgart Col James Fish

 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, Sept 28, 1956)
SACom to Reorganize 10 Subareas on Nov. 1

MUNICH, Sept 27 (Special) - The subareas of the Southern Area Comd will be reorganized on Nov. 1 as directed by SACom Hq.

The 10 subareas will be consolidated into four subareas covering the same geographical limits as before and still operating under SACom Hq.

Officials foresee only minor personnel changes, since the same amount of work in the way of logistical support of tactical units is still required of SACom.

"Purpose of the reorganizaiton," said. Maj Gen Numa A. Watson, SACom CG, "is to realign our command lines moreclosely to our logistical support channels."

Four New Areas
The four SACom subareas after Nov. 1 will be Stuttgart, Nurnberg, Munich and Garmisch. Former subarea headquarters will continue many of their logistical functionc as stations under the new subareas.

The new Stuttgart Subarea will incorporate the Schwaebisch Hall Subarea and five counties from the Augsburg Subarea -- Noerdlingen, Dillingen/Donau, Guenzburg, Neu ULM and Ulm. The new Nurnberg Subarea will include the former Grafenwoehr and Hohenfels subareas. The new Munich Subarea will incorporate Berchtesgaden, Straubing and the rest of Augsburg. Garmisch Subarea will remain the same for the present.

Recreational activities of the present Berchtesgaden Subarea will be under the direct operational control of SACom Hq, while logistical activities will be under the Munich Subarea.

One Command Change
Only one change in command is involved. Col Russell W. Schmelz, commanding officer of the Straubing Subarea, will replace Lt Col Harry N. Payne as commanding officer of the Munich Subarea. Payne is rotating to the US in a few months. Commanders of other subareas scheduled to be eliminated will remain as station commanders.

With the change, Watson said, most large tactical units will have to deal with only one subarea for logistical support. For instance, the entire 11th Abn Inf Div and the entire 6th Armd Cav Regt will be within the Munich Subarea. This will eliminate most of the cross-over support between sub-areas.

ORDNANCE FIELD MAINTENANCE
 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, Jan 26, 1954)
SACom Ordnance Division operates three Ordnance Field Maintenance Shops: at Munich, Stuttgart, and Nuernberg.

One and half years ago, the command started to replace the WWII-vintage trucks with new M-series trucks. A problem arose in the replacement program when it was determined that not all repair parts for the new trucks could be obtained through normal supply channels. SACom Ord Div decided to reclaim or rebuild the parts that could not be replaced.

Small reclamation sections were established at each of the three ord field maint shops. Soon these shops were returning to service major and minor vehicle assemblies and spare parts that normally would have been consigned to the scrap heap. Although the original critical situation has been eased, the reclamation shops continue their reclamation mission -- in the past year, for example, they reclaimed 614 vehicle engines at a net savings of over $616,000.

All three reclamation shops work on minor assemblies and spare parts. But under a recent policy change, only the Munich shop (located in Dachau) overhauls major assemblies. When the other two shops have a major assmbly to be reclaimed, they send it to the Munich shop.

Distribution of ordnance workload in SACom: Munich District 43 percent; Stuttgart District 32 percent; Nuernberg District 25 percent.

SACom Ord Div has initiated two other projects in an effort to improve quality of sevice: the Lateral Supply Program and the Direct Exchange Program.

Lateral Supply Program -- whenever a requirement develops for a major item or assembly which one district does not have on hand, the other two districts are queried to determine if they have the required item. If so, the item is dispatched to the point it is needed. This saves time in the procurement of the item from depot stocks.

Direct Exchange Program -- this program eliminates paper work and cuts red tape in the exchange process of unserviceable repair parts for serviceable parts. Units used to have to make up one document in numerous copies to turn in the unserviceable part and then another document to draw the replacement part. Now the unit simply tags the unserviceable part, presents it to ordnance, and picks up a new or reconditioned item in exchange.

7777 SIGNAL SERVICE COMPANY
 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, March 3, 1950)
The 7777th Signal Service Company was formed in Fuerth, Germany in February 1950.

30th ARMY BAND
 
(Source: Email from Philip Koslow, 30th Army Band, 1966-69)
I was stationed with the 30th Army Band in Munich from Dec. 1966 until May 1967. We were relocated to Kaiserslautern at that time (Webmaster note: the 30th was attached to the 32nd AADCOM at the time). I left in Jan 1969. 

In searching the internet for info regarding McGraw Kaserne, I have been able to find quite a bit but found that my visual memory from my time stationed there does not align with the updated version of that part of Munich.

I arrived in Munich about a week prior to the 1966 Xmas holidays via railroad from Frankfurt. I was met at the Hauptbahnhof by the 1st sergeant from the 30th Army Band. The 30th provided services for the Southern Area Command for many years following occupation and also traveled extensevely throughout Europe entertaining the locals etc. We went to Copenhagen, Berlin, Paris and numerous small German towns in southern Germany. All of this was certainly better than being stationed in Southeast Asia in the mid-sixties.

We were housed and rehearsed on the 3rd floor of a building that I think was Bldg. A. MP's occupied the 2nd floor and cooks were on the 1st floor. We walked next door (or a few doors from there) for mess hall. I recall a snack bar aross an open area near the WAC barracks and remember the Univ. of Maryland extension within sight of our housing. We did a retreat ceremony once a week for the General who asked us to wear dress blues for each occasion. Needless to say, we failed miserably at inspection time as we were not that military in most ways.

Unfortunately, word came down that the Band was being relocated to Kaiserslautern in May of 1967. Talk about a depressed group of guys! All my memories of Munich have been recalled with great joy. The German people (wherever we performed) were friendly and gracious. It was a grand time to be 20 years old and exposed to a different culture. It impacted my life immeasureably. The food, music, people and friendly gals remain with me after many years. Additionally, the Army experience set me on a road to a rewarding musical career. I left K-Town in January 1969 to pursue college and ultimately returned to Vienna to complete my musical studies.

I am retired in Las Vegas now but often reminisce about Munich, the Kaserne and old comrades that made my stay in Germany so meaningful.

No photos of my stay there other than a posed image with my french horn.

 
Nürnberg District
 
(Source: ARMY, NAVY & AIR FORCE JOURNAL, 8 August 1953)
Nurnberg District, Germany
By COL H.P. Hennessy
Atry, USA
Commanding

NURNBERG District is an important Area Command within the European Theater and has within its limits major training facilities for all arms, including facilities necessary to train complete divisions.

The name "District" is a comparatively new one, as during the period 1947-1952, the District was designated as a Military Post and only recently became one of three divisions within the Southern Area Command whose headquarters are in Munich, Bavaria. The Area Command of which the Nurnberg District is a part, controls a large portion of Southern Germany west of the Rhine and east of Austria and the Iron Curtain. This area is commanded by Maj. Gen. Kenneth F. Cramer.

The Nurnberg District has its headquarters in the town of Nurnberg, or, as English speaking people call it "Nuremberg," and the area controlled therefrom extends some 200 miles along the Czechoslovakian border and an additional 60 miles along the boundary of the Russian occupied zone of Germany. It extends from Passau on the Danube, where Germany meets Austria, nearly to Wurzburg.

Nurnberg is an ancient and important commercial city which for many centuries has been the hub of important trade routes. Even today the majority of the railroad lines which serve the city follow the great trade routes of the days of the Renaissance and earlier periods. Prior to World War II, it was famous for the medieval walls which enclose the older portion of the city and for the many buildings dating back as far as the 12th century which were to be found within these walls. However, the city was severely bombed during the recent war and many of the ancient buildings and landmarks were destroyed. It is now still undergoing extensive rebuilding. It is noteworthy that in this work of reconstruction the city authorities are trying, as far as possible, to preserve the ancient aspect of the older portion of the town while, at the same time, attempting to modernize the interior of the buildings to bring them up to modern requirements for living.

Nurnberg has always been regarded as one the most famous cities in this area and has served not only as the capital of the Holy Roman Empire, but also become the headquarters of the Nazi party during World War II. It was because of this circumstance that the ancient part of the town received such heavy damage, since because of the many tunnels which underlay that portion of the city, the the area was the site of many of the activities of the Nazi Party. It was seized by the XV Corps under General Haislip in April 1945 and has been a major headquarters for the American Army since that time.

Within the District are stationed major Infantry elements and numerous Corps and Artillery, technical and supply units. These troops live in barracks or "Kasernes" in accordance with the practice in Europe, in or near cities and towns. The families of the officers and enlisted men are not quartered with the barracks area, but in the general vicinity. Around Nurnberg there are several thousand dependents of military personnel as well as United States civilians and their dependents. Of this total, the majority live in houses requisitioned from German owners.

The barracks areas are of limited extent. In most cases they are the equivalent of from four to six city blocks and have restricted facilities for training. There are within the Nurnberg District, however, two great training areas. Grafenwohr and Hohenfels, which correct this deficiency. These training areas serve United States units from all of Germany and are not restricted to those stationed within the District. They also serve, occasionally, German border police organizations and the United States troop units from Austria.

The Grafenwohr training area is familiar to most officers of the combat arms who have been an duty in Germany during the past seven years. It was a Germany Army maneuver area at which many divisions were trained prior to and during World War II. The earlier temporary wooden buildings have been replaced during the past two years by simple concrete cantonments and camp areas with concrete floors, kitchens and latrines. This training area is rather large and is broken, varied and reasonably served by roads adequate for training purposes. There are ranges on which can be fired practically every type of Army weapon. To the best of my knowledge, there is no comparable area in the United States for all-around range and field training.

The Seventh Army Tank Training Center is located at Vilseck within the Grafenwohr reservation and is a major facility available to the Armored Forces within the European Command. It is equipped with every range and training aid.

Hohenfels is nearly as large and complete as Grafenwohr. It is also an old German Army training area. During the past year and a half, it has been developed with concrete cantonment construction plus camp areas similar to those at Grafenwohr. While not as large as Grafenwohr, it, too, can accommodate a large number of thoops. There are many ranges for all Army weapons, except the medium and heavy antiaircraft artillery.

The two training areas, Grafenwohr and Hohenfels, provide the most varied and extensive range facilities in Western Europe and their maintenance and development is a major responsibility of the Nurnberg District.

In the event of an emergency, the combat divisions and their supporting tactical, technical and supply units would move immediately to prepare for operations. By immediately I mean that their home areas must be cleared in a matter of a few hours. It is the responsibility of the District organization to so administer these areas that tactical troops are free to move at once and at full strength.

There are many civilians for whom the District organization is responsible, and by far the largest group is composed of the wives and children of United States military personnel. The troops and this large group of dependents must be supplied with many necessities and comforts which are not the responsibility of the military establishments in the United States. The troops In Germany are in a foreign land which is laboring to recover from a devastating war. These troops and particularly their families, are entitled to many services not available from the local economy in order to reasonably approximate United States living standards. All such matters are the responsibility of the District to the end that the troops shall be free at all times for their tactical mission. In addition to quarters for dependents which have already been mentioned, commissaries, schools, medical facilities and services, athletics and amusements, including American movies, are all provided. The European Theater Special Activities Division, with headquarters at Nurnberg, provides post exchange facilities throughout Europe and the Near East.

The District employs many Germans in various capacities, but principally as skilled or unskilled laborers and care takers. The administration of these employees is important, and their employment is a great help to the German economy.

In addition to the sizable sums which are sent home, approximately fifteen million dollars in American money are converted annually within the District into German marks and spent by United States military personnel and their dependants for the hire of servants, in local shops and in many other ways. This sizable expenditure is highly advantageous to the German dollar account and is equivalent to the expenditure of many tourists.

Relations with the German officials and people is a major District responsibility. As Germany moves from the status of an occupied country to membership to the European Defense Community, it is apparent that understanding and cooperation between the American Armed Forces and the German people must be established and fostered. Much has been done. The German Youth Activities established by General Clay have been an important step in the right direction. The German-American Womens' Clubs, and similar social activities have helped. Understanding between American Commanders and German officials has been established. Athletic contests in which the Americans compete with the Germans are of increasing significance. The Amerikahaus, fostered by the State Department, provides a voluminous library for the German population, as well as interesting entertainment events, and has been most instrumental in imparting to the German Population the idea of the American way of life.

In summation, it is believed that it may be said that the duties of the Nurnberg District are many and complicated and the fulfillment of these duties is an important factor to the assigned mission o! the United States Army in Europe.

 
Headquarters Area Command
 

Hammonds Barracks, Seckenheim, a few years after the inactivation of HACom Hqs
Headquarters Area Command insignia
 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, Dec 6 1952)
Heidelberg Military Post was redesignated as Headquarters Area Command effective December 1, 1952. This change, with others, occurred under the provisions of a USAREUR directive that reorganized the administrative structure of the military command in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany.

Col John F. Cassidy, formerly commanding officer of Heidelberg Military Post, assumed command of the newly formed HAC.

The boundaries of HAC are the same as those of the former military post with the exception of Karlsruhe Subpost which has been reassigned to the newly formed Southern Area Command.

(Source: STATION LIST, HACOM, APO 403, October 1955)
 
 
UNIT
 
 
STATUS
 
 
OPERATIONAL CONTROL
STATUS LEGEND:
-- Assigned to HACOM
A Attached to HACOM
L Lodger Unit
AUTOBAHN KASERNE, SECKENHEIM
15 QM Bn, Hq Det
L
15 QM Bn  
22 QM Co (Sub Sup) 1st Pltn
L
15 QM Bn  
62 MP Co (Hwy Patrol) Det "B"
A
HACOM  
526 QM Co (Svc)
L
15 QM Bn  
   
CAMPBELL BARRACKS, HEIDELBERG
4 Sig Group
L
Sig Div, USAREUR  
4 Strategic Int Det
L
Int Div, USAREUR  
6 MP Det (CI)
L
PM Div, USAREUR  
45 Lbr Supvn District
L
Med Div, USAREUR  
55 Strategic Int Det
L
Int Div, USAREUR  
168 Strategic Int Det
L
Int Div, USAREUR  
515 Engr Det (TOPO Ln)
L
Eng Div, USAREUR  
562 Trans Det (Strat)
L
Trans Div, USAREUR  
853 Comm Rec Det (Security)
L
ASA Europe, 8620 AU  
3331 USAREUR Lbr Svc Liaison Det
A
Lbr Svc Div, USAREUR  
3332 Labor Service Liaison Det
L
Med Div, USAREUR  
7752 AU, Cent Fin & Acctg Office
L
Fin Div, USAREUR  
7890 AU, Hq USAREUR
L
USAREUR  
MSTS Eastern Atlantic Sub Area
L
Comd MSTS EA&M Area  
US Naval Forces, Germany, Staff of the Comdr
L
CINCNELM  
COLEMAN BARRACKS, MANNHEIM-SANDHOFEN
CC "A", Hq & Hq Co
L
2nd Armored Division  
3 Armd FA Battalion
L
Hq, 2nd Armored Division  
11 Finance Disbursing Section
L
Fin Div, USAREUR  
19 Ordnance Bn, Hq & Hq Det (Sup)
L
51 Ordnance Group  
28 APU
L
7th Army  
40 Ordnance Co (Fld Sup)
L
7th Army  
41 Armd Inf Bn
L
CC "A", 2nd Armd Div  
41 Trans Bn (Army Acft)
L
7th Army  
45 Trans Co (Army Acft Maint) (Hvy Equip & Supply)
L
7th Army  
51 Ordnance Group, Hq Co
L
7th Army  
57 Tank Battalion
L
CCA "A", 2nd Armd Div  
63 Ordnance Co (Fld Sup)
L
19 Ordnance Bn  
94 AAA Bn (Gun 90mm)
L
1 AAA Group  
124 Armd Ordnance Bn, Co "A"
L
CC "A", 2nd Armd Div  
176 Sig Repair Co (Radar Tm #22)
L
39 Signal Group  
182 Ordnance Co (Fld Sup)
L
19 Ordnance Bn  
502 MP Det (1st Traffic Platoon)
L
CC "A", 2nd Armd Div  
585 Ordnance Co (Recovery & Classification)
L
87 Ordnance Bn  
768 Med Det (Dental Service), Hq
--
HACOM  
7703 AU, USAREUR Trans Army Acft Sup Ctr
L
Trans Div, USAREUR  
7838 AU, Ordnance Contract Det
L
Ordnance Div, USAREUR  
7841 AU, Ordnance Proc Ctr
L
Ordnance Div, USAREUR  
7862 AU, Det "A"
L
29 Signal Bn  
Air Force Liaison Team, Ordnance Stock Control Ctr
L
85 Supply Group, USAF  
DARGONER KASERNE, KARLSRUHE
26 Lbr Supervision District
--
115 LSC  
4080 Lbr Service Co (Guard)
--
115 LSC  
4081 Lbr Service Co (Guard)
--
6952 Lbr Service Ctr  
   
FUNARI BARRACKS, MANNHEIM-KAEFERTAL
1 AAA Group, Hq & Hq Btry
L
34 AAA Brig  
4 Cml Bn (Smk Genr), H&H Det
L
7th Army  
34 AAA Brig, H&H Btry
L
7th Army  
44 Cml Co (Smoke Genr)
L
4 Cml Bn (Smoke Genr)  
269 Ord Det (Wheel Veh Repair)
--
HACOM  
357 AAA Det (Operations)
L
7th Army  
504 AAA Det (Operations)
L
34 AAA Brig  
520 QM Co (Petrl Sup) Hq, 1st & 2nd Plat.
L
15 QM Bn  
527 MP Co (Prison Guard)
--
HACOM  
562 QM Service Det
L
15 QM Bn  
8252 Lbr Service Engineer Const Co
L
77 Engineer Bn (Const)  
   
GENDARMERIE KASERNE, MANNHEIM-SCHOENAU
115 LSC, Hq
--
HACOM  
4015 Lbr Service Co (Guard)
--
115 LSC  
4033 Lbr Service Co (Guard)
--
115 LSC  
4094 Lbr Service Co (Guard)
--
115 LSC  
6952 Lbr Service Ctr
--
115 LSC  
   
GERSZEWSKI BARRACKS, KARLSRUHE
8 Med Co (Amb) (Sep)
L
7th Army  
18 Ordnance Co (Direct Support)
L
7th Army  
29 Signal Bn (Const)
L
516 Signal Group  
40 Signal Bn (Const)
L
7th Army  
69 Cml Co (Smoke Genr)
L
4 Cml Bn (Smoke Genr)  
69 AAA Group
L
34 AAA Brig  
73 AAA Bn (AW) (SP)
L
69 AAA Group  
163 AAA Operations Det
L
7th Army  
176 Signal Det, Tms #14 & 23
L
39 Signal Group  
427 CIC Det (Team 2B)
L
427 CIC Det  
552 AAA Bn (Gun 90mm)
L
69 AAA Group  
761 Med Det
L
7th Army  
   
HAMMONDS BARRACKS, MANNHEIM-SECKENHEIM
7734 AU, USAREUR Electronic Warfare Det
L
Signal Div, USAREUR  
7774 AU, USAREUR Sig Service Bn, Co "A" & "B"
L
4th Signal Group  
7809 AU, HQ & Svc Co, Hq ASC
--
HACOM  
9487 Tech Service Det
L
Signal Div, USAREUR  
   
KARLSRUHESTRASSE, HEIDELBERG
5 Surg Hospital (Mbl Army)
L
31 Medical Group  
13 Medical Det
--
7779 AU, Hq Area Det, Medical Group  
14 Medical Det
--
7779 AU, Hq Area Det, Medical Group  
130 Station Hospital
--
HACOM  
487 Medical Det (VFIM)
--
HACOM  
7779 AU, Hq Area Det, Medical Group
A
130 Station Hospital  
7890 AU, Medical Div, Hq USAREUR
L
Medical Div, USAREUR  
   
NEUREUT CANTONMENT, KARLSRUHE
79 Engineer Bn (Const)
L
Engineer Div, USAREUR  
516 Signal Group, Hq & Hq Det
L
Signal Div, USAREUR  
529 FA Bn (Obsvn)
L
V Corps  
6980 Lbr Service Signal Construction Bn
L
516 Signal Group  
6981 Lbr Service Construction Bn
L
516 Signal Group  
8594 Lbr Service Engineer Float Bridge Co
L
555 Engineer Group (Combat)  
8595 Lbr Service Brg Maint Platoon
L
11 Lbr Supervision District  
   
PATTON BARRACKS, HEIDELBERG
4 Base Post Office (Type O)
--
HACOM  
10 MRU
L
65 MRU  
11 MRU (Type Z)
L
AG Div, USAREUR  
33 Army Band
L
Special Troops, USAREUR  
62 MP Co (Hwy Patrol)
L
PM Div, USAREUR  
65 MRU (Mbl) (Type Z)
L
AG Div, USAREUR  
91 Ordnance Det (Tech Intel)
L
Ordnance Div, USAREUR  
176 Engineer Platoon (Service)
L
Special Troops, USAREUR  
519 Transportation Co (Car)
L
Special Troops, USAREUR  
529 MP Co (Sep)
L
Special Troops, USAREUR  
7774 AU, Co "C" (USAREUR Sig Svc Bn) (WAC)
L
4 Signal Group  
7809 AU, Utilities Det
L
Special Troops, USAREUR  
7869 AU, QM Tech Int Det
L
QM Div, USAREUR  
7888 AU, Hq Special Troops, Hq USAREUR
L
USAREUR  
   
PHILLIPS BARRACKS, KARLSRUHE
62 Transportation Co
L
29 Transportation Bn (Truck)  
499 Engineer Bn (Combat) (Army)
L
555 Engineer Group (Combat)  
502 Engineer Co (Pontoon Bridge)
L
555 Engineer Group (Combat)  
555 Engineer Group (Combat), Hq & Hq Co
L
555 Engineer Group (Combat)  
809 Engineer Co (Panel Bridge)
L
555 Engineer Group (Combat)  
   
RHINELAND KASERNE, ETTLINGEN
11 Lbr Supervision District
L
116 Lbr Supervision Center  
39 Engineer Group (Const), H&H Co
L
39 Engineer Group (Const)  
77 Engineer Bn (Const), Hq & Svc Co
L
39 Engineer Group (Const)  
175 Engineer Co (Heavy Equipment)
L
39 Engineer Group (Const)  
275 Engineer Co (Dump Truck)
L
77 Engineer Bn (Const)  
6970 Lbr Service Engineer Const Bn
L
39 Engineer Group (Const)  
7132 Lbr Service Engineer Const Co
L
77 Engineer Bn (Const)  
7566 Lbr Service Engineer Dump Truck Co
L
39 Engineer Group (Const)  
8541 Lbr Service Engineer DUKW Co
L
6970 Lbr Service Engineer Const Bn  
8552 Lbr Service Engineer Const Co
L
39 Engineer Group (Const)  
   
SMILEY BARRACKS, KARLSRUHE
3 Medical Dispensary
--
HACOM  
9 Mil Hist Det
L
Hist Div, USAREUR  
10 Mil Hist Det (Type B)
L
Hist Div, USAREUR  
11 Mil Hist Det (Type A)
L
Hist Div, USAREUR  
44 Finance Disbursing Section
L
Fin & Acctg Section  
102 Signal Bn (Micro-Wave & Radio Relay), Hq Co
L
4 Signal Group  
382 MP Bn, Co "B"
--
HACOM  
525 QM Co (Svc), 3rd & 4th Platoon
L
15 QM Bn  
548 Army Postal Unit (Type V)
--
HACOM  
7755 AU, Dependents School Det, Dependents Education Group
L
USAREUR  
7779 AU, Hq Area Det, Medical Group
A
HACOM  
7809 AU, Karlsruhe Det, Hq ASC
--
HACOM  
American Red Cross
L
ARC, Field Dir  
Historical Division
L
USAREUR  
Karlsruhe Sub Area HACOM
--
HACOM  
USAREUR Central Film Equipment Exchange (69 Sig Co (Photo))
L
Signal Div, USAREUR  
   
SPINELLI BARRACKS, MANNHEIM-FEUDENHEIM
49 Lbr Supervision District
L
19 Ordnance Group (Sep)  
53 Ordnance Group, Hq & Hq Co
L
Ordnance Div, USAREUR  
78 Ordnance Co (Field Supply)
L
19 Ordnance Bn  
86 Ordnance Det
L
Ordnance Div, USAREUR  
175 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Det
L
Ordnance Div, USAREUR  
856 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Det
L
Ordnance Div, USAREUR  
7835 AU, 53 Ordnance Augmentation Det
L
Ordnance Div, USAREUR  
7836 AU, Mannheim Ordnance Supply Depot
L
53 Ordnance Group  
8900 Lbr Service Ordnance Supply Depot Co
L
49 Lbr Supervision District  
Mannheim Ordnance Supply Depot
L
53 Ordnance Group  
   
SULLIVAN BARRACKS, MANNHEIM-KAEFERTAL
7 AAA Bn (Lt) (75mm)
L
1 AAA Group  
17 Medical Det
--
HACOM  
62 AAA Bn (AW) (SP)
L
1 AAA Group  
151 Ordnance Det (Integrated Fire Control Repair)
L
7th Army  
370 Ordnance Det (IFCD-38)
L
7th Army  
382 MP Bn, Hq & Hq Co
--
HACOM  
382 MP Bn, Co "A"
--
HACOM  
382 MP Bn, Co "C"
--
HACOM  
510 Tank Bn (Gun 120mm)
L
7th Army  
531 Ordnance Co (DS)
L
7th Army  
595 Signal Det (Support)
L
595 Signal Co (Support)  
733 Medical Det
L
7th Army  
7728 Claims Unit
L
USAREUR  
American Red Cross
L
ARC, Field Dir  
   
TAYLOR BARRACKS, MANNHEIM-KAEFERTAL
37 Engineer Bn (Combat) (Army)
L
11 Engineer Group (Combat)  
350 Infantry Regiment
L
7th Army  
427 CIC Det (Team 23)
L
7th Army  
535 Engineer Co (Lt Equipment)
L
11 Engineer Group (Combat)  
   
TOMPKINS BARRACKS, SCHWETZINGEN
8 Transportation Group, H&H Co
L
8 Transportation Group (Mvmnt Control)  
11 Engineer Group (Combat), Hq & Hq Co
L
7th Army  
22 Engineer Platoon (Repro)
L
656 Engineer Bn (TOPO) (Army)  
32 Lbr Supervision District
L
115 LSC  
51 Lbr Supervision District
L
Rheinau Transportation Center  
59 Engineer Platoon (Camouflage)
L
Engineer Div, USAREUR  
64 Engineer Det (TOPO)
L
656 Engineer Bn (TOPO) (Army)  
139 Engineer Det (Terrain)
L
Engineer Div, USAREUR  
501 Engineer Det (Tech Int. Research)
L
139 Engineer Det  
509 Engineer Det (Terrain)
L
139 Engineer Det  
524 Engineer Co (TOPO) (Corps)
L
7th Army  
530 Engineer Co (Panel Bridge)
L
11 Engineer Group (Combat)  
541 Engineer Co (Float Bridge)
L
11 Engineer Group (Combat)  
656 Engineer Bn (TOPO) (Army)
L
USAREUR Engineer Int Center  
738 Engineer Co (Supply Point), 1st Platoon
L
7th Army  
964 Engineer Co (Field Maint)
L
521 Engineer Group  
4189 Lbr Service Co
--
32 Lbr Supervision District  
4207 Lbr Service Co
--
32 Lbr Supervision District  
7758 AU, Engineer Reproduction Det
L
139 Engineer Det  
8380 Lbr Service LCL Transportation Det
L
51 Lbr Supervision District  
8591 Lbr Service Engr Float Bridge Co
L
51 Lbr Supervision District  
8592 Lbr Service Bridge Maint Platoon
L
11 Engineer Group (Combat)  
Hq, USAREUR, Engineer Int Center
L
Engineer Div, USAREUR  
   
TURLEY BARRACKS, MANNHEIM
28 Transportation Bn (Trk), H&H Co
L
37 TMTC  
37 Transportation Motor Trans Comd, Hq & Hq Co
L
Transportation Div, USAREUR  
40 Transportation Co (Medium Trk)
L
29 Transportation Bn (Trk)  
66 Transportation Co (Medium Trk)
L
28 Transportation Bn (Trk)  
69 Transportation Co (Medium Trk)
L
28 Transportation Bn (Trk)  
84 Transportation Co (Medium Trk)
L
181 Transportation Bn (Trk)  
89 Transportation Co (Medium Trk)
L
28 Transportation Bn (Trk)  
108 Transportation Co (Light Trk)
L
181 Transportation Bn (Trk)  
181 Transportation Bn (Trk), Hq & Hq Co
L
37 TMTC  
342 Transportation Co (Light Trk) (Army)
L
28 Transportation Bn (Trk)  
503 Transportation Co (Light Trk)
L
181 Transportation Bn (Trk)  
4087 Lbr Service Co (Guard)
--
115 LSC  
7056 Air Int Service Squad, Det 6
L
USAFE  
USAF Hist Research Div, Team #9
L
USAFE  
   
UNITS LOCATED AT MISCELLANEOUS ADDRESSES
2 Reg de Spahis Algerians
L
5 Div Blindes (French Army) Pforzheim, Buckenberg Kaserne
8 Trans Gp (Mvmnt Ctl), Hq
L
Transportation Div, USAREUR Rheinau, Transportation Center
8 Trans Gp (Mvmnt Ctl)
L
8 Trans Gp (Mvmnt Ctl) Karlsruhe, 19 Lammstrasse
31 Weather Squad, Det 9
L
Hq 31 Weather Squad Heidelberg, Airfield
62 MP Co (Hwy Ptl), Det "B" (Sub Det)
L
PM, Karlsruhe Karlsruhe, Autobahn
66 CIC Reg I
L
66 CIC Mannheim, 5 Am Oberen Luisenpark
481 MP Det (Crim Invest)
L
PM, HACOM Mannheim, 10 Maximilianstrasse
485 GAA
L
5 Div Blindes (French Army) Karlsruhe, Grenadier Kaserne
4022 Lbr Service Co (Guard)
--
115 LSC Heidelberg, 3 Rudolf Dieselstrasse
4023 Lbr Service Co (Guard)
--
115 LSC Mannheim-Neuostheim, 1 Mühlfeldweg
6952 Lbr Service Center, Hq Co
--
115 LSC Mannheim-Schönau, 88 Lilienthalstrasse
7705 AU, USAREUR Transportation Center
--
Transportation Div, USAREUR Mannheim-Rheinau
7751 MP Customs Unit, Heidelberg Det
L
Hq 7751 MP Customs Unit Heidelberg, Airfield
7787 AU, Aviation Det
L
Special Troops, USAREUR Heidelberg, Airfield
7807 USAREUR Det
L
USAREUR Mannheim, 5 Am Oberen Luisenpark
7807 USAREUR Det
L
USAREUR Karlsruhe, 8 Südl. Hildapromenade
8063 Lbr Service Medical Det
L
31 Medical Group Mannheim-Schönau, 88 Lilienthalstrasse
8745 Lbr Service Engineer Const Co
L
77 Engineer Bn (Const) Seckenheim, Autobahn
American Express Co Inc
L
Civ Heidelberg, 16 Friedrich Ebert Allee
American Red Cross (Field Dir)
L
ARC Heidelberg, 11 Rohrbacherstrasse
Canadian Government
L
Canadian State Dept Karlsruhe, 11 Roedtenbachstrasse
Chase Manhattan Bank
L
Civ Heidelberg, 11 Rohrbacherstrasse
EES (Local Installation)
L
7738 AU, EES Group Karlsruhe, Community Center
Rheinau Engineer Coal Point
L
Engineer Div, USAREUR Rheinau, 41 Ruhrortstrasse
US Navy Rhine River Patrol, Unit K
L
US Navy Rhine River Patrol Karlsruhe, 11-16 Werftstrasse
US Navy Rhine River Patrol, Unit M
L
US Navy Rhine River Patrol Mannheim-Sandhofen, Riedspitze
USAREUR Exchange Service (PX)
L
EES Feudenheim, Bunker
USAREUR Military Prison
--
HACOM Mannheim, Bismarkstrasse
Western Exchange
L
7738 AU, EES Group Heidelberg, Czernyring
   

 
(Source: List of General Orders Naming Kasernes, USAREUR Military History web site)

Map of Heidelberg Military Post, 1958
At the time of the publication of the pamphlet: "History of Kasernes, Heidelberg Post" (see cover on the left), there were eleven kasernes located within the boundaries of the military post.


Click on image to view the contents
 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, March 30, 1958)
HACom Holds Last Review

Headquarters Area Command cased its colors in a formal deactivation ceremony held at Hammonds Barracks in Mannheim-Seckenheim on Saturday, March 29. Col Nathaniel R. Hoskot, HACom commanding officer, cased the colors at a regimental review, signifying the deactivation of the command and its incorporation into Northern Area Command (NACom), effective April 1.

HACom officials explained that the Mannheim-Heidelberg portion of former HACom becomes the Heidelberg Military Post, while HACom's Karlsruhe Subarea becomes the Karlsruhe Military Post. The two new posts bring the number of such organizations in NACom to 12.

In March 1949, the headquarters of the "original" Heidelberg Military Post (formed in March 1947 and redesignated as HACom in December 1952) was moved from downtown Heidelberg to Hammonds Barracks in Seckenheim.

(Source: Email from Martin Smith, 527th MP Co, 1953-1954)
527th Military Police Company (Prison Guard)

I did some research on my tour in 1953-54. I sailed from Brooklyn, NY to Europe in August 1953 on the USNS General Patch. We landed first in England (Dover) and then went to Bremerhaven where we disembarked and were sent by train to Zweibruecken in Southern Germany.

From there, I was assigned to the 527th MP Prison Guard Company at Taylor Barracks in Mannheim-Kafertal, Germany. I spent one year there.

I was "on the walls" of the Military Prison in Mannheim as a guard for three months and then was assigned to Sargeant Salas, in charge of training the company. I served as instructor and was also sent to school to be a public information specialist. I had also gotten trained as a projectionist while at Indiantown Gap, PA after basic training there in the Fall and Winter of 1952-53.

While awaiting assignment at the Gap, I served as a stockade prison guard, as well as various other assignments. I guess that's part of the reason I was sent to the 527th when I got to Germany.

While working for Sgt. Salas, I also wrote and edited articles for the Headquarters Command newspaper as I was involved with the company's softball and volleyball teams as their manager. I served in that company until Late August 1954 and then returned in order to go back to college in September 1954.

While stationed with the 527th, I was also the Assisitant Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 142, Kafertal, Germany. The kids were from families who were stationed there in the Army. They were from many states and we had great time with them that year. We started in about October 1953 with about 15 scouts and by the time I left, we had a troop of about 65 kids, an explorer piost with about 15 boys and were about to start a cub scout pack. My colleague, whose name was Norman Feder, was the Scoutmaster and I think he was from California. He had been there before me and was stationed across the street from our barracks with the MP Town Patrol Company at Funari Barracks. While there, he helped me get the three merit badges I needed for Eagle Scout. I was fortunate to get that while serving there in the Army. (I don't think many people in the military have had that experience). I received my Eagle Scout Badge at a big honors meeting. It was given by General Van Houton, in charge of the Headquarters Area Command at the time.

I remember that one of my Company officers was a Lt. Swad. My Captain was the head of our scout troop parents committee.

527th MP Co
Mannheim

 

1. Main Gate, 1953(KB)

2. 527th MP Co barracks (KB)

3. Company street (KB)
 

4. Post chapel (KB)

5. Vehicle maintenance shops (KB)

6. Coleman Bks (KB)


7. Company sign (KB)

8. MP picnic (KB)

9. Buddies (KB)


Rhine River Patrol
Sandhofen

 

1. Unit M (KB)

2. Unit M (KB)


 

Replacement Center
Zweibrücken

 

1. Replacement Center (KB)

 



ORDNANCE SERVICE CENTER MANNHEIM
 
 
 
click here to read more about the successor unit - Mannheim EMC.

TRANSPORTATION SECTION, HACOM
 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, June 1 1954)
The Transportation Section, HQ HACom, is supported by personnel from the 7809th Station Complement Unit. Primary mission of the Trans Sec is to provide transportation support to HACom and all units, agencies, activities and personnel stationed in the HACom area. Transportation Officer of HACom is Lt Col W.D. Kelly.

SUBORDINATE ELEMENTS:
Highway Branch - coordinates all highway movements within the command and allocates administrative vehicles to units within HACom. HACom administrative vehicles carried over 7 million passengers and drove approx. 6 million miles in 1953.

The highway section also trains German (those employed by US forces) and military drivers.

The highway branch operates the military bus station at the Heidelberg Shopping Center and the motor pools in Heidelberg, Mannheim and Karlsruhe.

Redeployment Branch - this section handles overseas movement of military and civilian personnel and their dependents.

Rail Branch - operates the Rail Transportation Offices (typically located at major train stations).

The section also handles receipt and shipment of all household goods and baggage in and out of HACom (includes customs checks). An average of 300 pieces of baggage passes through the branch's warehouse per day .

 
Southeastern Area Command
 

Sheridan Barracks, HQ Southeastern Area Command, 1953 (Webmaster's collection)
 

Sheridan Barracks, HQ Southeastern Area Command, 1953 (Webmaster's collection)

SEACom Decal
.

 
Western Area Command
 
The Western Area Command was established at Kaiserslautern, Germany, on December 1, 1952, pursuant to General Order 27, USAREUR, October 27, 1952. It replaced the Rhine Military Post. Its jurisdiction included the districts of Baumholder, Bad Kreuznach, Pirmasens, Worms, Mainz, Kaiserslautern, and Koblenz.

It was discontinued on March 1, 1959, with functions transferred to the Northern Area Command.
 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, March 21, 1956)
The Western Area Command (WACom) was established on March 20, 1951 as the Rhine Military Post. First CO of the command was COL Frederick M. Thompson. RMP was reorganized and redesignated as WACom in December 1952.

WACom covers 7,648 square miles. In the past five years the command has grown from a few scattered French kasernes into a giant depot complex that supports 7th Army and other US and NATO forces. Nearly 500 units are stationed within the AOR of WACom.

WACom comprises four subareas: Kaiserslautern, Pirmasens, Baumholder and Bad Kreuznach.

 
(Source: Email from Rod Currie, Pirmasens Sub-Area, 1957-58)

Directions to various D'Isly Ksn activities
I was stationed at D'Isly Kaserne in Pirmasens, Germany, U.S. Army, 1957-1958, as an SP4, M.O.S. 701.1. The hill-top base had been a military post for many, many years, having subsequently been operated by not only the Americans, but at times by the French and the Germans as well. Am not sure the exact chain-of-command connection my company had with the Signal outfit, but I was assigned to the post Sub-Area Command Headquarters Company at the base.

While my primary function there was in S-3, 'Plans & Training', I also served as a field reporter for the WACom Courier and the STARS & STRIPES. I spent much of my tour in Germany on TDY, however, on various army rifle teams, on up to an including U.S. Army All-Europe squad. I can still remember those pockets of glare ice on the rifle ranges, the tears literally freezing on my face on our Western Area Command Baumholder range in mid-winter. In retrospect, I was probably one of the few G.I.s I know who's basic assigned weapon was a National Match-grade M-1 Garand. Tough way to get it, though. What kills me today is that I could have bought one then [since I was on the rifle team] from the Army for a mere $157.00. That would have been one of the better financial investments that I could have made in my life.
During my tour there President Eisenhower pulled a number of our troops out of Germany [I think both Signal and Engineering out of Pirmasens] to send down to Lebanon. At that time it looked like the Russians were going to attempt a 'coup' there and our people were rushed down there [along with Navy and Marines and the 11th Airborne] to 'block' any possible Soviet takeover. Ironically, the Germans, who certainly had no love for us then, [do things ever change?] suddenly realized how much money the U.S. military population [and military dependants] were contributing to the German economy. 'Augsburg', with the almost complete removal of the 11th Airborne, went into a virtual mini-depression. Panicked at the thought of losing all that money the German government in Bonn attempted to pass a resolution 'forbidding' the United States from removing troops from Germany.[!] This never came to pass, I believe, but a lot of 'negotiating' ensued out of the resulting mess.

Much of my reporting 'efforts' were, in fact, actually 'propaganda' in nature and centered around "improving German-American relations". In this respect, for example, our engineering battalions would perform 'volunteer' construction work on German roads - the G.I.s supplying effort and equipment and the Germans supplying fuel for the equipment. To the best of my knowledge we [military] had virtually no involvement with the French in those days. At that time France was not participating in NATO, said they had no need for us, and were not exactly 'friendly' towards U.S. involvement in Europe.

The military situation was such in Europe at that time that the Soviet Union had more 'paratroopers' alone stationed in the Eastern Block nations than we had total troops in all of NATO - all participating countries! It was my estimate back then that had the Russians gone ahead and made the 'push' they could have completely over-run us in less than a month. This, by the way, was the primary reason I first tried out for the Base rifle team - just so I could get my hands on a decent-conditioned rifle, rather than the rattling pieces of junk that they kept in the arms racks for us 'administrative types'. This was a very nervous time in Europe and it was very difficult to tell how the future was going to play out.

In retrospect I think what really held the Russians back were their [then] recent memories of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. The Russians had to bring in literally thousands of tanks to quell an uprising that was armed with little more than Molotov Cocktails, 'rocks', and a few rifles. I'm sure that the Russians realized that had they attempted to move forward against us that a good number of the Eastern Block countries might probably rise up behind them and cut their supply lines off. It may be, then, that Hungary's 'defeat' was our own salvation.

SIGNAL SERVICE UNIT KAISERSLAUTERN
 
1958 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, Feb 13, 1958)
WACom's Commo Center Hums

KAISERSLAUTERN, Germany (Special) - Western Area Comd runs an around-the-clock outfit here devoted exclusively to getting the word.

The WACom communications center here specializes in getting the word just where the Army wants it, and getting it there fast.

The center is the hub of the WACom communications system which handles more than 47,000 messages each month. These messages are received, sent out or relayed to other points during the course of an average day's work.

There are 26 tributary stations within WACom which receive messages directly from WACom Hq, according to Capt Earl E. Eidecker, the communications officer.

"To show how a message is transmitted," he says, "let's assume that our headquarters was to send a message to six subareas. After the message is logged in at the center, a 'poking operator' types the message on a teletype machine which produces a perforated tape and a typewritten copy. Our operators then transmit the tape to the receiving station."

The perforated tape is fed through a machine which transmits the message to a similar machine in the station receiving the message, officials explain.

The center here also acts as a relay station for other stations. Because it is highly impractical to read all incoming relayed messages, each tape on which the messages are handled is monitored and retained for 24 hours. Then it is destroyed, officials point out.

Most messages sent outside the area command are relayed through the Pirmasens relay center, one of the largest in the world.

In addition to the teletype system, the center also operates voice-radio nets and a constant wave net which utilizes international Morse Code. Each of these systems can be operated independently of the others.

1963 
(Source: Email from Phillip Cochran)

The USA Signal Service Unit Detachment 5 headquarters was in Panzer Kaserne, Kaiserslautern. The signal service units were important for their role with the communications of military bases in Germany.

In December 1963 I arrived in Germany under the USAREUR command. I believe in the spring of 1965 we were transferred to the STRATCOM command.

Detachment 5 KSLN consisted of a total of 4 main Kaserne's:
Kaiserslautern
Bad Kreuznach
Baumholder

Pirmasens.

I was first stationed at Baumholder 1963-1965, then Pirmasens 1965-1966.

Our duties were to maintain and install telephone communications equipment on base and surrounding area's. Our training was at Fort Gordon, Georgia at the signal school. My MOS was 322 (telephone installation and repair) than changed to 36B20 later. (321 was linemen pole climbers, and 322 cable splicers)

We were trained to work and install field telephones and switchboards, and also regular phones and installation. I could have been assigned to a infantry signal company or how it was I got assigned to base support unit. I might add some individuals were with an engineer unit that was assigned on base working with German nationals as electricians, plumbers and equipment maintenance usually 5 or 6 men. We had 3 soldiers plus 2 German nationals working in Baumholder and 3 soldiers working in Pirmasens. I don't know what the arrangements were in Bad Kreuznach or Kaiserslautern.

Baumholder telephone central office was in its own building which wasn't very big compared to other buildings on post. It was separated from tactical units on post across the road from the MP station. I was unaware if they had an engineer unit that worked on base doing various jobs at the different buildings in Baumholder. In Pirmasens they were billeted with us so that is why I knew the unit existed.

In Baumholder the switchboard had women German nationals working on it. Once in awhile when they were a lot on vacation or sick I was assigned to work on it. The young officers on base always asked us who this one was or that one and what she looked liked. In Pirmasens there was no switchboard so no female operators. We did employ a secretary at Baumholder but not at Pirmasens. Our central office did employ male German nationals who worked in the the switching frame and battery room.

In 1966 in Pirmasens we removed all German Telefunken and Siemens phones replacing them with american Western Electric phones. I think they were designated TP5 or TP256. Under the dial we put a disc saying "unsecured phone" or something to that effect.

I need to mention that we did not work on phones in dependent housing areas. The German civilian telephone offices (Deutsche Bundespost - DBP) maintained them. The dependent housing was the same in both Baumholder and Pirmasens in regards to phone maintenance although we were required to distribute new phone books through out the dependent housing area.

Also the engineer building our central office was in was under USAREUR while they wore USAREUR patches like me which caused me to get a bunch inoculations while the doctor thought I was going TDY to another country with the engineer outfit but I wasn't leaving Pirmasens.

Back to Baumholder. There was an ASA group that we also supported by working on their phones. They were just off the main post. Whereas Baumholder had a lot of infantry, tank, and artillery, Pirmasens was mainly storage facilities. They had a signal storage area there and if we worked out there we would pick up new tools for our work to use. There were quite a few 3/4 ton trucks stored there. I have to mentioned that a few storage facilities that existed there that I didn't know of. The Clausen chemical gas depot - I was never there so their communications wasn't by normal telephone unless that was built after I left in 1966. Ruppertsweiler I wasn't aware of either. Camp Dahn didn't exist either where the 20th Ordnance Company was located.

Before Dahn there was a small lake Germans had for recreation but farther down the road was a cave we worked in. At first they had guards who escorted you (when entering to do some work); then in end it was used by an electrical test equipment calibration unit with no escorts needed. On the road between Dahn and Rodalben you could see occasionally storage bunkers. There was also off the road a pump stationed we worked at, a small building with inside a telephone switching and wire frame. Also one area throughout the woods was ammo dumps with no guards or fenced off.

Salzwoog, 56th ADA ( C Battery I believe), we worked at the administration building, also barracks & mess hall was located there too, but I never worked at the launching site or the radar site. I was at D battery once or twice. I also worked at Fischbach: when we went back into the cave after a long walk the guards exchanged their rifles for batons , went thru a gate and escorted us farther to our work location. At Massweiler there waere also guards who escorted us throughout the cave. Massweiler had an interesting elevator system that I saw once.

We also worked frequently at Kreuzberg Kaserne in Zweibrucken where Army and I believe some Air Force personnel were located. Munchweiler hospital we worked frequently there. Hinterweidenthal fuel tank farm we worked out there occasionally. There we had special non-sparking telephones installed out around the depot. They stored gas, diesel and jet fuel that was brought in by pipeline and rail, I was told, for distribution throughout Germany. I have no idea what unit was there but I think it was a AWSCOM unit. Hinterweidenthal had their own barracks and mess hall not far from the tank farm. Also on the road between Dahn and Hinterweidenthal off the road was a barracks and a mess hall that usually was vacant but a couple of times the polish labor service utilized that camp for a few weeks. It may also have been between Hinterweidenthal and Rodalben I can't remember for sure.

I forgot to mention that in Massweiler one of my friends was with the engineer unit and was stationed there with a sergeant to maintain the generators, lighting and other things.

In Pirmasens we worked all over the post but I didn't have a security clearance so places like STRATCOM Signal I couldn't work inside. Our central office was in the long curved engineer building across from I believe the library or USO building next to the STRACTOM mess hall.

In Baumholder there were three individuals in our quarters who maintained a microwave communications equipment and tower but I don't remember their signal unit. We also had the base photographer who also made new ID"s for the military personnel.

In Pirmasens a signal unit under STRATCOM handled communications between the USA and Germany and maybe all of Europe I can't remember for sure. I understood they used teletype communications. It was a 24 hour 7 day a week operation with WAC's working with their male counterparts at the installation. They had a large antenna field
hooked up to there system. I can't remember there unit designation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Our signal service unit was just like a Bell Telephone office in the USA. In Baumholder we had a central office switching frame that was maintained by 4 german nationals and a switchboard with maybe 15 to 20 operators. The switchboard would transfer calls to other bases, connect military lines to civilian lines and connect calls to and from the USA. Also we were in direct communications with military command in the USA to alert the base for a maneuver operations. Bells rung and lights flashed and you had quit whatever you were doing and immediately answer that call, sometimes it was only a test but you still recorded it.

In Baumholder we worked in the various buildings for the different units repairing there phones and installing new phone locations and removing old phone installations and fixing their messes when the field wiremen tried to install a phone. We also had to change wire locations in different main frame rooms around base for new phone locations or additional lines. I read there were other facilities around Baumholder which I don't recall working at, namely Hoppstaden airfield, although I remember working at airfield an aifield but I thought it was closer to Baumholder. Neubrucke hospital - I don't believe I ever went there but others may have. Strassburg Kaserne & Nahbollenbach Army Depot - I do remember going there to work a few times by Idar-Oberstein. Camp Aulenbach we worked out there sometimes but usually we had lunch at one of the two gausthaus more often. It was a occasion when you got to see the different foreign countries military units on maneuvers there. One time a couple of guys had to go over by Trier I believe to the impact area, was from artillery fire from Camp Aulenbach.

We made occasional trips to Kaiserlautern Headquarters to pick up payroll and supplies when needed.


 
1967
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, Oct 7, 1967)
The Signal Service Unit Kaiserslautern is one of five units in the 4th Signal Group that provide communications support to the area commands within USAREUR, including operating long-distance military telephone exchanges, a teletype terminal and a high-speed data terminal station in the worldwide STARCOM network.

The unit is commanded by Maj Richard H. Hightower. It consists of five sub-units (exchanges) that each average about 2,000 lines, 19 operators, 4 supervisors and a chief operator and assistant. The transmission lines include AC dial, voice frequency and VF circuits.

427th ARMY BAND
 
1954 
(Source: Email from Robert Busbee, 427th Army Band)
I was stationed in Kaiserslautern in 1954 - 1955 with the 427th Army Band. When I arrived in mid-1954, we were located in Kleber Kaserne. In early 1955, we were relocated to Panzer Kaserne. We provided music for most military ceremonies in Kaiserslautern, as well as Idar-Oberstein, Worms, and many other installations in our sector which I cannot remember. We also made a trip to Huy, Belgium (see photos and article below).

Since I was just a young draftee, this was just a job, and I could hardly wait to get back home and be a civilian again. But looking back, I realize that this was one of the best times of my life, because I got to go places and see things that I would never have otherwise. As I surf the web now, I cannot find anything about the 427th Army Band, its activities, or its personnel during and after my time.

427th Army Band
Kaiserslautern, Germany
Click here to read the accompanying article from the WACom Courier, 17 Sept 1954
 

1. The 427th Army Band holds a concert in the town quare of Huy, Belgium (KB)

2. The two band leaders meet before a special mass (KB)

3. MSgt Washington receives a warm reception from the Lord Mayor of Huy for having participated in the liberation of Belgium in 1944 (KB)


4. Historical article in 33rd Armd Band Assn. Newsletter
     


The WacomAires Dance Band playing at a service club (Stu Gibson)
 

Members of the 427th Army Band waiting for a train (Stu Gibson)
 
(Source: Email from Stu Gibson)

Dance Band members
  Difficult to know where to begin. Probably giving you much more than you want.

The 427th Army Band was a 28-piece band stationed in Kaiserlautern (K-town). We were the Western Area Command Headquarters Band. We played many military reviews at K-town posts such as Kleber and Vogelweh, but we also spent a lot of time "on the road" providing music for military reviews in outlying posts like Baumholder, and Pirmasens. We also played some civilian events for K-town.

The 28 members were an interesting mix; I can remember at least 15 drafted college grads, a few High School kids, maybe a half dozen career men, a few short-time Regular Army.

We had great quarters on Panzer Kaserne, but pretty lousy rehearsal facilities. Relatively no heat, snow blowing in around the doors or windows, band rehearsing in gloves and overcoats.

Some very successful people in the band from that time (1955-56). Bass drummer Art Graham became a Metropolitan Opera Soloists (as a tenor, not a drummer) in the 1960's. Al Duffy invented and received the US patent on the chain link bass drum pedal. Dave Stokan, a music prof at the University of Texas. Gene Cherico, bass man for (among others) Stan Getz. Ernie Rider, dentist. Gibson, Pales, Don Smith were all HS instrumental music teachers. Sorry, I do not have info on all.

Within the band we developed a Dance band called the WacomAires (for Western Area Command). We played a 15 minute show every week on the Armed Forces Network, with DJ Al Martin as M.C. We also played (in civies) on weekends (for a few $), at the Ramstein Air Force Base Officers Club, and other military clubs in the area. I have attached a couple Dance band pix, I believe taken at a non-com club at Kleber Kaserne, K-town.

The Kleber non com club job was playing for "German American Friendship Night". In the middle of a number, a GI entered, saw his girl with some guy, and a brawl broke out. Tables were turning over, chairs flying and our piano man got hit with a flying beer bottle. We left immediately.

Our bus trips on the cobble stone roads into the mountains were pretty brutal. Pionital (sp?) cysts were a common ailment. An oncoming truck took off our exterior rear view mirror during a head on pass. Another time, coming from Baumholder, an engine cooling fan flew off and severed our brake line. We had one more "uphill" area. Driver geared down and we coasted to a stop.

We were probably on the road 3 or 4 times a week. After about a year of busing, it seemed everyone was worried about being in a wreck. (Remember those rural roads? Very narrow, trees on both sides)

Baumholder was a tank base. Sometimes we would be out in the woods, playing next to an elevated reviewing stand as tanks when by on dirt trails. (not our favorite gig)

On the 4th of July (it was called the "Generals Birthday Party"), we set up ouside of the Generals house and played to the people inside. After we started playing they would close the windows.

The band was kind of hard to handle, mostly stuff I do not want to tell you. But, I remember we had to play for a Little League Game on a Saturday afternoon, and we didn't want to do it. During a break behind the bleachers, the band ran in a circle around the drummers, did a rain dance, threw our hats on the ground and made whooping sounds for a few minutes, then got back in the stands to play -- and it actually rained after another inning.

That's about it for now. I am a retired school music teacher, still play trombone in a couple of big bands. I do some internet searches on band members. Found Fifer, Graham, Waters, Don Smith, Rider, and a few others (Stokan, Duffy, Loess, Ironmonger) that I believe are deceased.


ORDNANCE SERVICE CENTER KAISERSLAUERN
 
1953
(Source: STARS & STRIPES)
WACom Ordnance (Service) Center was established in 1951. Chief of WACom Ord Cen (since its inception) is Col Harold T. Moses.

The center supports all units assigned or attached to WACom as well as all lodger units assigned to USAREUR.

Since 1951, the center has increased 85 percent in area -- 11 major structures and an ammunition and storage depot have been constructed. A 100-machine allied trades shop has been established -- this is where basic parts are reclaimed or manufactured for the supply field and maintenance sections.

The center now employs more than 400 German civilians.

 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, May 12, 1954)
The Ord Field Shop of the Ordnance Service Center at Panzer Kaserne, Kaiserslautern, formed a "contact team" in April to bring its services to all units in the Western Area Command.

The contact team consists of two automotive mechanics, one small arms repairman and a supply man. The team is equipped to perform third-echelon repairs of not more than two hours per job.

 
1959
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, Jan 22, 1959)
The WACom Ordnance Service Center at Kaiserslautern is responsible for various tasks such as repairing weapons, rebuilding military vehicles, operating a "country store" and supplying parts to keep the command's 6,000 support vehicles working. CO of the Service Center is COL Ernest R, Gillespie. He has a staff of 10 officers, 28 enlisted men and 432 German civilians.

Maintenance Division - rebuilds or makes major repairs on some 300 vehicles a month. Division chief is 1st Lt Emmett Sims.

Stock Records Section - located in a recently modernized building (which doubled the storage space), the section has 8,000 steel bins for storage of ordnance parts.

"Country Store" - patterned after supermarkets, unit supply personnel can go through the store with a shopping cart to gather various parts required by the unit and then check out in the same manner as a supermarket shopper.

Direct Exchange Section - this section stores select fast moving parts such as automobile starters, generators, carburetors and fuel pumps. Unit motor pools use this service to replace spare parts, saving the expense of towing the vehicle to the center and possible loss to the unit while awaiting repairs.

 
1964
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, April 1, 1964)
The Ordnance Service Center at Kaiserslautern provides maintenance and support for more than 20,000 wheeled vehicles and equipment used in the Kaiserslautern area. CO of the center is Maj Robert E. Welch.

Among the activities of the ordnance service center is an assembly line repair facility that rebuilds truck axles instead of replacing axles with new equipment shipped from the States. The rebuild program at the center started in February 1963 and has saved the US government over $1 million in the first year of operation. (More than 2,000 axles have been rebuilt in that first year.)

Originally, only 2½-ton truck axles were repaired. Now, the center also processes ¾ - , 5- and 10-ton truck axles.
 
Click here to read more about the successor unit - Kaiserslautern EMC.

 
Army Posts in Germany, mid 1960s
 
(Source: Army Posts Overseas in "Guide to Army Posts," ARMY TIMES, Stackpole Books, July 1966)
GERMANY
In 1965, military posts in Germany were reorganized and ten districts were formed under the US Army Area Command which is located in Munich.

The ten districts, with corresponding headquarters cities, are:
South Bavaria Augsburg
North Bavaria Nuernberg
North Wuerttemberg Stuttgart
North Baden Heidelberg
Palatinate Kaiserslautern
Rhineland Bad Kreuznach
Taunus Frankfurt
Hesse Giessen
Vogelsberg Hanau
Franconia Wuerzburg
 
Some additional details on the districts:
South Bavaria The South Bavaria District covers an area of 21,857 square miles of Southern Germany. Headquarters of the District is in Augsburg, APO 09178. Sub-districts are headquartered at Ulm, Munich, Garmisch, Bad Toelz and Berchtesgaden.
North Bavaria The Nurnberg-Furth Enclave was officially established on 17 May 1946. This developed into the Nurnberg-Furth Military Community in December 1946 and a station complement unit was billeted in what was then known as Sedan Kaserne in Furth (later redesignated W.O. Darby Kaserne). The Nurnberg Sub-Area became part of the Southern Area Command in 1954 and a number of redesignations followed. From 1959 to 1965, it was known as Nurnberg Post. After the Northern and Southern Area Commands merged into the US Army Area Command, the post was designated as Hqs, North Bavaria District, USAACOM, on 1 July 1965. Within the district are five sub-districts: Illesheim, Erlangen, Ansbach, Bayreuth and Bamberg.
North Wurttemberg North Wurttemberg District includes Patch Barracks, Robinson Barracks, Kelley Barracks, Nellingen Kaserne, Flak Kaserne and the Army hospital at Bad Cannstatt.
North Baden Headquartered at Heidelberg (Patton Barracks, APO 09102), the district includes sub-districts at Mannheim, Karlsruhe and Worms.
Palatinate The Palatinate District with headquarters at Panzer Kaserne, APO 09227, encompasses the Rheinland-Pfalz and Saarland states of Germany, and covers an area of about 2,800 square miles. There has been a headquarters at Kaiserslautern since 1945. Only the names have been changed, and the boundaries. From 1945 to 1951 it was designated as Headquarters, Western Area Command. In 1951, the name was changed to Rhine Military Post. During a series of changes in 1959, Northern Area Command was formed in Frankfurt; Southern Area Command was established in Munich; and this headquarters became known as Kaiserslautern Post, a sub-district of Northern Area Command. Northern and Southern Area Commands were welded into a single headquarters in July 1964, but Kaiserslautern Post retained its designation until July 1965, when it was redesignated as Palatinate District. On that date, the headquarters absorbed the Pirmasens area to attain its present size.

Pirmasens (Sub-)Post opened on 6 July 1961.
Rhineland Headquarters of the Rhineland District is in Bad Kreuznach, APO 09252. BK opened on 12 June 1951 and became headquarters of the Rhineland District in 1965. Sub-districts are at Mainz and Baumholder.
Taunus Headquarters of the Taunus District are at Frankfurt, APO 09757. The District's mission is to provide logistical support and recreational facilities for about 40,000 dependents, civilian employees and military personnel. Frankfurt Post includes the Frankfurt and Darmstadt areas, with the main headquarters behind the IG Farben Building. It includes Gutleut Kaserne, 3804 Kaserne, Drake-Edwards Kaserne, Gibbs Kaserne, McNair Kaserne in Hoechst and Camp Eschborn.
Hesse Headquarters, Taunus District is located on Pendleton Barracks, APO 09169. This post served as a German artillery kaserne during World War II. Before the kaserne was constructed, the area around Pendleton was known as the Philosophenwald. In 1947, the community was known as Giessen Military Post. Since that time, it has been renamed Giessen Sub-Post, Giessen Detachment, Giessen Sub-area, Giessen Post, and now Hesse District.

Kassel (Rothwesten Kaserne) is a sub-district of Hesse District.
Vogelsberg Headquarters of the Vogelsberg District is located on Pioneer Kaserne, Hanau, APO 09165. The district extends into nine counties (Kreise) of Hesse and five counties of Bavaria. Elements of the Seventh Army, V Corps, VII Corps and the 3rd Armd Div are also stationed at Gelnhausen and Buedingen, Fulda, Wildflecken, Bad Kissingen and Bad Hersfeld.

Fulda (Sub-district) includes sub-posts at Bad Hersfeld, Bad Kissingen and Wildflecken.
Franconia Franconia District includes Leighton Barracks, Emery Barracks, Hindenburg Kaserne and Faulenberg Kaserne. The post was activated on 15 March 1947. In October 1952, it was redesignated as the Wurzburg Military District, consisting of the geographical area encompassed by various landkreise of Land Bavaria. As a result of a survey completed in late 1953, the Wurzburg Military District was reorganized on 1 March 1954, into three sub-areas: Wurzburg, Schweinfurt and Bamberg. On 1 April 1958, the Wurzburg Sub-Area was reorganized and redesignated as Wurzburg Post. The most recent change in the organizational structure became effective on 1 July 1965, when Wurzburg Post was redesignated Franconia District.
 
The following posts are not included in the US Army Area Command organization:
Bremerhaven POE The US Port was established by the Army on 7 June 1945. Officially named the US Army Port of Embarkation, Bremerhaven, on 1 January 1957, the port continued to operate as a major command of USAREUR until 1 July 1960, at which time it was placed under the administrative control and operations of Headquarters, US Army Communications Zone, Europe. Bremerhaven POE became the US Army Terminal Command, Europe (USATCEUR) on 1 May 1964.
Berlin Command  
Seventh Army Training Center The Training Center includes the Grafenwohr, Vilseck and Hohenfels areas. The Training Center constitutes the largest training area available to US forces in Europe: Grafenwohr & Vilseck training area - 56,560 acres; Hohenfels training area - 40,032 acres. Vilseck Camp was not used for training (by US forces) until May 1947, when the 370th and 371st Infantry Battalions trained at Grafenwohr. In June 1951, it became the Seventh Army Tank Training Center with headquarters in Vilseck. In 1959, the entire Grafenwohr reservation, which included Grafenwohr and Vilseck sub-posts, was redesignated as one training center, the Seventh Army Training Center (7ATC) with headquarters at the Grafenwohr Post. The Vilseck installation became the Seventh Army Combined Arms School. At the same time, the Hohefels training area was assigned to 7ATC.